“Dogfish Woman”
Artist: Bill Reid (Haida)
Construction: Plastic, Steel, Marble
Donated by: Allan and Faigie Waisman
Location: Northwest Corner of Academic Quadrangle (SFU) 
Collection: SFU Art Collection

 

 

“Bear Mother”
Artist: Bill Reid (Haida)
Construction: Plaster, Steel, Marble
Donated by: Allan and Faigie Waisman
Location: Northwest Corner of Academic Quadrangle (SFU)
Collection: SFU Art Collection 

 


“Frog Constellation”
Artist: Jim Hart (Haida)
Construction: Red Cedar (1995)
Collection: Bill Reid Foundation/SFU
Location: Atrium Gathering Space, Saywell Hall (Northeast Corner of Academic Quadrangle, SFU) 

Squamish Weavings - “L’ Hen Awtwx” Nexw Niw Chet / The Teachings
Construction: Hand Woven Wool (2009)
Collection: SFU
Location: Atrium Gathering Space, Saywell Hall (Northeast Corner of Academic Quadrangle, SFU)


"Written in the Earth"
Artist: Susan Point 
Construction: Cast Aluminum and Red Cedar (2000)
Location: Atrium Gathering Space, Saywell Hall 

"Blue Herons" (Panel No.1)
Artist: Susan Point 
Construction: Red Cedar and Paint (2008)
Location: Atrium, TASC 1

"Blue Herons" (Panel No.2)
Artist: Susan Point 
Construction: Red Cedar and Paint (2008)
Location: Atrium, TASC 1

"Blue Herons" (Panel No.3)
Artist: Susan Point 
Construction: Red Cedar and Paint (2008)
Location: Atrium, TASC 1

The Métis sash is developed from both European and First Nations roots. Several Eastern Canadian First Nations groups shared the tradition of the wampum belt, a sash-like belt made of hide upon which prophecies of the future were embroidered. Sashes are worn by men and women and are usually belted around the waist or worn diagonally across the shoulder. Métis sashes are today worn with pride at social gatherings, celebrations, formal events, and any other time a Métis person wishes to express pride of heritage. 



The Renaissance Coffee Totem Pole is clearly visible from the Renaissance Coffee area in the northeast corner of the Academic Quadrangle at Simon Fraser University. It was carved — circa 1970 — by a non-Aboriginal archaeology student, who has chosen to remain anonymous. In an outside location, exposed to the elements, it looks much like such poles would have in traditional Northwest Coast First Nations communities. 

In the early 1970s, Ray Wesley of the Tsimshian First Nation was commissioned by the Alumni Association to carve these poles, which stood for many years in Naheeno Park, on the southern flank of Burnaby Mountain. They have been restored through funding from the Alumni Association under the auspices of the SFU Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology. The shorter pole depicts a wolf with its tail evident at the bottom. The taller pole depicts a bear grasping a raven with a frog below. After extensive consultations with a committee involving various campus partners – and after considering numerous options around the campus, inside and outside – it was decided to give two of the historic Ray Wesley totem poles a place of honor and recognition outside the Office for Aboriginal Peoples (OAP). The inside location will protect the poles long term, will provide some visibility to the OAP, and is a place of importance for the poles which honors them and their carver, Mr. Ray Wesley.

This First Nations Copper/Owl/Raven wall hanging was created in 2010 by Heiltsuk-Cree artist and elder, Mia Hunt (Thàqvailh). The striking red and black design features a traditional West Coast First Nations “copper” with an owl’s head within. This is framed by two raven figures. “Coppers” were created from copper metal. They were beaten into sheets or plates and then painted with traditional figures, usually clan symbols. Coppers were considered status items and thus held great value, being passed down through generations. Regarding the raven, it is a highly respected creature among West Coast First Nations people. It is widely recognized as a trickster figure, a spiritual being with transformative powers, who would teach lessons to mankind. The raven is also viewed by some groups as a creator and provider to mankind. Location of wall hanging: Career Services Atrium, Room 0300, Maggie Benston Building, SFU.