Shera Fisk

Email: sfisk@sfu.ca

BSc APBI: University of British Columbia 2016

Supervisor: Dr. Hugo Cardoso

Research Areas: Taphonomy, Human Osteology, Post-Mortem Interval, Osteological Diagenesis, Forensic Anthropology

MA Research:

A strong background in science and immunological research has caused me to become extremely interested in the processes of bone formation, as well as the effects of post-mortem breakdown on these structures. My current research investigates the effects of differing post-mortem environments on the rate of juvenile skeletal degradation, when compared to that of adult bone material under the same conditions. Currently, methods of determining post-mortem interval are based primarily on observations of adult remains; developing a reliable timeline for juvenile bone destruction will aid forensic investigators in the positive identification of skeletonized juvenile remains.

Conference Presentations:

2017. (S Fisk, L Spake, L Marinho, E Gooderham, HFV Cardoso). The use of dental and skeletal indicators to predict the age of menarche from juvenile human skeletal remains [Poster]. Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Vancouver, British Columbia.

2017. (L Marino, S Fisk, E Gooderham, L Spake, HFV Cardoso). The effects of bilateral asymmetry in long bone length on juvenile age predictions [Poster]. Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Vancouver, British Columbia.

2017. (E Gooderham, L Marinho, L Spake, S Fisk, AL Santos, HFV Cardoso). Severe skeletal lesions and loss of bone mass in a child associated with a case of spinal tuberculosis and prolonged immobilization [Poster]. Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Vancouver, British Columbia.

2016. (L Spake, E Gooderham, S Fisk, L Marinho, HFV Cardoso). Growth status of survivors and non-survivors of skeletal tuberculosis: the relevance of records of child admissions to the Sant’Ana Sanitarium, Portugal (1904-1953) for health studies of archaeological populations [Podium]. Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Physical Anthropology. Peterborough, Ontario.

2015. (S Fisk, M Monajemi, S Menzies, L Sly). The role of MALT1 in osteoclast differentiation and activity [Poster and Podium]. The Annual Summer Student Research Program at the UBC Child & Family Research Institute. Vancouver, British Columbia.