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Alzheimer's, HST, Decisions

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September 21, 2010
Soaring cost of Alzheimer’s disease
A new report from Alzheimer’s Disease International suggests the cost of dealing with the debilitating disease could reach $604 billion worldwide this year – and health officials say those costs could soar as the number of those afflicted triples over the next four decades. SFU gerontologists Andrew Sixsmith, director of SFU’s Gerontology Research Centre, former director Gloria Gutman, who recently gave a talk on the issue to a health sciences class on chronic disease, and gerontology chairAndrew Wister can all talk about the implications of dementia. Jeremy Snyder, an ethics expert in health sciences, can talk generally about how gene testing for Alzheimer’s could increase stigmatization and decrease access to care for the disease.

Andrew Sixsmith, 778.782.5375; sixsmith@sfu.ca
Gloria Gutman, 778.782.5063; gloria_gutman@sfu.ca
Andrew Wister, 778.782.5044; wister@sfu.ca
Jeremy Snyder, 778.782.3258; jcs12@sfu.ca

Debating the HST debate
The provincial government is not backing down from requests to move up the Sept. 2011 date of the referendum on the HST. But SFU political scientist Kennedy Stewart predicts the delay won’t necessarily result in the public relegating the issue to a back burner. At an HST forum hosted by SFU’s School for Public Policy, Stewart will discuss his latest research on who signs initiative petitions and why the anti-HST signers don’t fit the conventional profile. The forum is Monday, Sept. 27, at SFU Vancouver, Harbour Centre, 7-9 p.m., 7000 level. SFU professors Doug McArthurJon Kesselman and Nancy Olewiler will also speak at the forum. http://at.sfu.ca/bKrfaJ

Kennedy Stewart, 778.782.7913; kennedys@sfu.ca
Doug McArthur, 778.782.5208, 604.786.0016 (cell); dmarthu@sfu.ca

Decision-making dilemmas
In the MIT Sloan Management Review, research looking at the pros and cons of decision-based evidence making versus evidence-based decision making, two SFU business professors have found that managers are often caught between the two. Peter Tingling and Michael Brydon found that managers use evidence in three different ways: to make, inform, or support a decision. Tingling can discuss the perils of engaging in the latter, especially when faced with major dilemmas, such as how to deal with the recent BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Peter Tingling, 778.782.3473; peter_tingling@sfu.ca

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