Issues & Experts >  Issues & Experts Archive > Pickton, bullying, dollar, labour

Pickton, bullying, dollar, labour

Document Tools

Print This Page

Email This Page

Font Size
S      M      L      XL

November 19, 2007
Pickton trial winds down
Of bullies and justice
Swing high swing low
Labour history repeating itself
Mulroney ready to take it on the chin


Pickton trial winds down
Final arguments are underway this week in the 10-month old trial of Robert Pickton and the case soon proceeds to the jury for deliberation. SFU experts can look at various aspects of the crime and court proceedings, from the impact of media coverage to jury stress. Check our list of experts at: http://www.sfu.ca/pamr/news_releases/archives/news01250701.htm

Marianne Meadahl, PAMR, 778.782.3210

Of bullies and justice
Nov. 19-25 is Bullying Awareness Week and Restorative Justice Week in Canada, an interesting convergence for SFU criminologist Brenda Morrison who works at the intersection of both fields of study. The author of Restoring Safe School Communities: A Whole School Response to Bullying, Violence and Alienation, is available to discuss her recommendations about the best ways to restore the social and emotional health of young people and their schools.

Brenda Morrison
, 778.782.7627, brendam@sfu.ca

Swing high swing low
The Canadian dollar is swinging high and spurring many Canadian Christmas shoppers to seek yuletide refuge in American stores where the dollar is low. But SFU tourism expert Peter Williams says the high Canadian dollar is translating into a reversal of fortune in Canada's tourism industry. Williams says: "The real impact of the declining American tourist traffic to Canada and B.C. will hit especially hard later this winter and continue well into the summer. That's when the twin effects of the higher dollar, increased inflation and higher gasoline costs will turn into ‘in your face’ realities for U.S. visitors."

Peter Williams, 778.782.3103, peterw@sfu.ca

Labour history repeating itself
A recent B.C. Human Rights Tribunal ruling reminds Mark Leier, director of SFU's Centre for Labour Studies, of stories of immigrant labours being abused during the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Leier says there are similarities between the treatment of Asian labourers during the railway's construction more than 100 years ago and that of Latin American labourers working on today's Canada Line. The tribunal ruled that the companies building the rapid transit addition intimidated and coerced the construction workers to de-unionize. Leier can elaborate on the parallel.

Mark Leier
, 778.782.5827, leier@sfu.ca

Mulroney ready to take it on the chin
German-Canadian businessman Karlheinz Schreiber's eight-year battle to avoid being extradited to Germany is turning into a political nightmare for Prime Minister Stephen Harper and predecessors Brian Mulroney. Schreiber's latest allegation that Mulroney, while prime minister, helped him set up a pasta business in exchange for $300,000 has failed to get him a stay of extradition. But it has sparked a public inquiry, which will include a re-investigation of the businessman's allegation that Mulroney personally benefited from his government's purchase of Airbus planes in 1988. SFU political scientist Patrick Smith can comment on why Harper is reopening this political can of worms and why Mulroney is welcoming the investigation rather than fighting it.

Patrick Smith, 778.782.3088, 604.291.1544, psmith.sfu@gmail.com