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Issues & Experts >  Issues & Experts Archive > Aboriginal students, Frenglish, healthcare majors - Issues, Experts and Ideas

Aboriginal students, Frenglish, healthcare majors - Issues, Experts and Ideas

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February 10, 2006
Conspiracy, what conspiracy?

SFU education dean Paul Shaker takes issue with a recent Fraser Institute report that says a lack of public accountably over aboriginal student academic results amounts to a “conspiracy of silence” by aboriginal leaders and education authorities. “There's no conspiracy,” says Shaker. “It's the number one priority of the ministry of education and many other stakeholder groups not only in British Columbia but across western Canada.”


Parlez vous French?

Francophone groups and opposition MPs are howling over the Harper government's appointment of a parliamentary secretary for la Francophonie who doesn't speak French. But SFU business and public policy expert John Richards, who speaks fluent French, says Tory appointment choices west of Winnipeg will be extremely limited if French literacy is a prerequisite.

The next big thing on campus? Majoring in healthcare

As a recent New York Times article noted, health sciences programs are soaring in popularity at universities across the US. David MacLean, dean of SFU's new health sciences faculty, says the trend is also catching on in Canada - and SFU is on the leading edge.