Welcome to SFU.ca.
You have reached this page because we have detected you have a browser that is not supported by our web site and its stylesheets. We are happy to bring you here a text version of the SFU site. It offers you all the site's links and info, but without the graphics.
You may be able to update your browser and take advantage of the full graphical website. This could be done FREE at one of the following links, depending on your computer and operating system.
Or you may simply continue with the text version.

*Windows:*
FireFox (Recommended) http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/
Netscape http://browser.netscape.com
Opera http://www.opera.com/

*Macintosh OSX:*
FireFox (Recommended) http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/
Netscape http://browser.netscape.com
Opera http://www.opera.com/

*Macintosh OS 8.5-9.22:*
The only currently supported browser that we know of is iCAB. This is a free browser to download and try, but there is a cost to purchase it.
http://www.icab.de/index.html
Issues & Experts >  Issues & Experts Archive > Missiles, algae, development - Issues, Experts and Ideas

Missiles, algae, development - Issues, Experts and Ideas

Document Tools

Print This Page

Email This Page

Add to del.icio.us

Font Size
S      M      L      XL

July 05, 2006
Who should be afraid of whom?
Algae bloom mystifies scientists
A new face in Surrey could change the face of Surrey

Who should be afraid of whom?

That’s the question media may be asking themselves following North Korea’s embarrassing failure of its missile test. Doug Ross, an SFU expert on national security, has an interesting perspective on the likely political fallout of the failed, seven-missile test in North Korea. He predicts that it could solidify rather than jeopardize relations between South and North Korea, making the U.S. a spurned ally of the South.

Douglas Ross, 604-737-8040 (h), douglasr@sfu.ca

Algae bloom mystifies scientists

The algae bloom off the coast of Vancouver Island may be the biggest bloom known to scientists and visible from space—but scientists still aren’t sure how worried they should be about it. SFU biologist Brian Hartwick can offer some thought on whether the bloom is connected to global warming. Hartwick notes that, though bigger than normal, this kind of marine phenomenon is common this time of year. He adds: “Further offshore summer blooms are less of an occurrence presumably because of the abundance of many tiny grazers. So it’ll be interesting to see what happens if the bloom continues to spread.”

Brian Hartwick, 604-291-4802, hartwick@sfu.ca

A new face in Surrey could change the face of Surrey

With SFU Surrey set to open its new award-winning campus to students in September, the new kid on the block next to the Surrey Central SkyTrain station is the talk of the town. The director of SFU’s city program at the Harbour Centre campus, Gordon Price, says that the new Surrey campus could change the face of Surrey in the Whalley area. Price, a one-time Vancouver city councillor, can talk about how the design and layout of the new campus, with its neighbouring, courtyard style amenities, is making that area of Whalley more walkable and human-friendly. “Surrey was laid out on the assumption that people move in cars at 50 to 100 kilometres an hour,” says Price. “The development in and around SFU Surrey brings down the scale of Whalley’s huge blocks and setback buildings, allowing for the kind of human-scale development that has made areas of Vancouver a big draw.” SFU Surrey will celebrate the opening of its new campus September 8-9. Issues and Experts will highlight the campus’ faculty and research leading up to the celebrations. Keep an eye on this webpage http://www.sfu.ca/surrey/opening/ for updates.

Gordon Price, 604-291-5081, gordon_price@sfu.ca