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Issues & Experts >  Issues & Experts Archive > Salmon controversy spawns presenters — Issues, Experts and Ideas

Salmon controversy spawns presenters — Issues, Experts and Ideas

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October 19, 2006

Salmon farming and sea lice net a big audience

Seven-month-long public hearings on the state of B.C.’s salmon farming industry are drawing so many presenters in their final days that they have been extended. Rick Routledge, a SFU fish population statistician, and Larry Albright, a recently retired SFU marine microbiologist, were among more than 20 presenters yesterday who drove the hearings into overtime.

Routledge said the fate of wild salmon is at stake if the provincial government doesn’t acknowledge and act on what is common knowledge in Europe: fish farm sea lice kill juvenile salmon in droves. Routledge can expand on what he thinks should be done to rectify the situation.

Albright said he can help the province do what many researchers and fish farmers say can’t be done: farm salmon, even the prized sockeye, in enclosed fresh water tanks. Albright, the co-owner of a fresh-water fish farm in Langley, has cultured in fresh water the same stock of domesticated sockeye salmon through four sequential lifecycles. Albright can talk about his success and what he plans to do with his domesticated sockeye.