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Issues & Experts >  Issues & Experts Archive > Dream reading, Going to pot – Issues, Experts, and Ideas

Dream reading, Going to pot – Issues, Experts, and Ideas

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October 27, 2006
Dream reading
Going to pot

Dream reading
Peter Behrens, a long-time advisor to SFU’s Praxis Centre for Screenwriters, will read from his debut novel The Law of Dreams—recently short-listed for a Governor General’s literary award—at the Shebeen Whiskey House in Gastown on Thursday, Nov. 2 at 8 p.m. Seating is free but limited: e-mail praxis@sfu.ca to reserve a space.
 
To arrange an interview with Peter Behrens, contact Patricia Gruben:
(o) 604.268.7881; gruben@sfu.ca


Going to pot
The Supreme Court of Canada has unanimously ruled that an Alberta judge who ordered a jury to convict a medical marijuana activist on pot-trafficking charges went too far and violated the rights of the accused. Yesterday the court overturned the 2003 guilty verdict against Calgarian Grant Krieger, a victim of multiple sclerosis who is legally permitted to smoke pot but not to supply it to others—which he freely admits to doing. If the Crown chooses to retry the case, it will be the third time Krieger has faced a jury on the same charge of possession of marijuana for purposes of trafficking. Criminologist Neil Boyd can speak to the implications of this judgment.

Neil Boyd, 604.291.3324; neil_boyd@sfu.ca