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Issues & Experts >  Issues & Experts Archive > Sea urchin DNA, restorative justice – Issues, Experts and Ideas

Sea urchin DNA, restorative justice – Issues, Experts and Ideas

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November 09, 2006

Sequencing sea urchins
Healing and accountability

Sequencing sea urchins
SFU molecular biology and biochemistry professor Bruce Brandhorst is one of 200 international scientists who have successfully sequenced the DNA genome of a sea urchin. Sea urchins and humans share many of the same gene families, and as reported this week in the leading journal, Science, the mapping of sea urchin DNA will significantly contribute to a better understanding of human diseases and embryonic development, as well as the evolution of sensory organs and elaborate but distinctive immune systems in animals. Brandhorst is available to expand on the details and implications of this important research.

Bruce Brandhorst, 604-291-5366/4627, brandhor@sfu.ca


Healing and accountability
Nov. 12 to 19 is Restorative Justice Week in Canada, and this year’s theme, Creative Partnerships & Collaborative Action, aims to introduce restorative justice principles, values and initiatives to a broader national audience. SFU criminologist Liz Elliott can speak on all aspects of restorative justice, defined as a non-adversarial, non-retributive approach to justice that emphasizes healing in victims, meaningful accountability of offenders, and the involvement of citizens in creating healthier, safer communities.

Liz Elliott, 604-291-4730, elizabee@sfu.ca