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The new TASC2 building's facilities put SFU on the front lines of fields like nanomedicine and industrial mathematics.

The new TASC2 building's facilities put SFU on the front lines of fields like nanomedicine and industrial mathematics.

TASC2 building unveiled

May 3, 2007

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By Marianne Meadahl

SFU officially opened its new science and technology building—considered one of B.C.'s most complex building projects—on April 30 in the building's atrium.

The Technology and Science Complex 2 (TASC2) is home to 4D Laboratories, a major project funded through the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the B.C. Knowledge Development Fund.

The lab brings together chemists, physicists and engineers conducting research at the forefront of molecular electronics and the use of nanomaterials (smaller than the eye can see) in medicine, including drug delivery and therapeutics.

Other TASC2 research groups study a range of issues, from greenhouse gas reduction to the monitoring and analysis of global media.

The building's unique features include vibration-free floating floors for ultra-high resolution microscopes and lasers, a huge clean room for creating advanced materials, an environmental toxicology lab and a fully equipped recording studio.

Located on the Burnaby campus' southeastern corner, TASC2 also houses the MITACS (Mathematics of Information Technology and Complex Systems) and PIMS (Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences) facilities, as well as numerous specialized labs and offices.

"These magnificent new facilities put SFU on the front lines of fields like nanomedicine and industrial mathematics," says SFU President Michael Stevenson. "These developments result equally from the excellence of our faculty and students, and from the generous financial investments of the B.C. government and the Canada Foundation for Innovation."

Bill Krane, associate VP and chair of the TASC2 building committee, says funding arrangements for the $59.9 million project are unique in SFU's history, with funds primarily coming from the proceeds of SFU's bond issue and contributions from federal and provincial governments and other sources.

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