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More summer sojourners

August 5, 2010

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It’s summertime and the learning is easier off campus for many SFU students, staff and faculty members. SFU News has a look at what some of them are doing.
 
Tübingen, Germany
Kieran Egan  Kirsti Medig
SFU Tennis
Seen here at Prince Charles’ residential summer school, The Culture of Building, are (left to right) Hank Dittmar, chief executive of the Prince’s Foundation for the Built Environment, SFU urban studies grad students Steve Chou and Mike Soron, HRH The Prince of Wales, grad students Jillian Glover, Carolyn Ruhland, Danielle Wensauer and Laura Slater, and urban studies adjunct professor Ken Cameron.
 
 SFU urban studies grad students Mike Soron and Laura Slater use lime mortar to help build the foundation for a timber-framed building.
David Mirhady
Associate professor and humanities department chair, David Mirhady, spent a month in Tübingen, Germany this summer as a guest of the Seminar for Rhetorical Studies. He was finishing a new edition and English translation of the 4th-century BCE (before common era) rhetorical treatise known as the Rhetoric to Alexander for the Loeb Classical Library. The treatise is a comprehensive text on how to compose speeches.

Kieran Egan
Greece’s University of the Aegean recognized education professor Kieran Egan’s educational theories, research and practices this summer with an honorary degree. Egan was all set to receive his citation at the majestic Grandmaster’s Palace on the island of Rhodes, but plans changed at the last moment when bits of the palace’s battlements started falling. He received his degree at a ceremony at the university, which is also on the island.

Kirsti Medig
What was happening on the continental shelf of North America one billion years ago? It’s a question that has dogged geologists for decades. Earth sciences grad student Kirsti Medig spent the summer in the northern Yukon in a bid to find the answer. She was doing a comprehensive analysis of the Pinguicula Group of Proterozoic rocks exposed in the Wernecke Mountains. “Was the Pinguicula Group deposited in a sea between ancestral North America and Australia? Or was it deposited into an open sea off of the margins of the continent?” asks Medig. “Resolving these questions will contribute to the ever-evolving interpretations of continental configurations and movements on our planet through time.”

SFU Tennis
SFU’s top-four rated tennis club is competing in Toronto this month at Tennis Canada’s Canadian University and College Team Championships. The event is being held conjunction with the Rogers Cup pro tournament Aug. 7–15. Runners-up in the western qualifier this spring, SFU joins the universities of Alberta, Montreal and York for the national tournament’s second year. The SFU team finished No. 2 in the country last year after a tight loss in the finals to Montreal. Tennis is not yet a Canadian Interuniversity Sport activity, but Tennis Canada has been working to promote the game at the collegiate level across the country.

Prince’s Foundation
Six urban studies grad students are spending three weeks in England and Wales studying sustainable building techniques at a summer school hosted by the Prince’s Foundation for the Built Environment, an educational charity established in 1986 by Prince Charles. Entitled The Culture of Building, it’s the first summer school since SFU began a partnership in November 2009 with the foundation, which promotes advanced education in sustainable urbanism. Lectures and workshops include drawing and building exercises and field trips to develop students’ knowledge of traditional building and repair techniques, including thatching and dry-stone walling, and how to apply them in the 21st century. The program ends with a weeklong charrette (an intense design session) in Wales, where students must design a structure to be built later this year by the Prince of Wales’ building-crafts apprentices.

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