People

No

SFU PEOPLE IN THE NEWS - October 5, 2010

October 5, 2010

Document Tools

Print This Article

E-mail This Page

Font Size
S      M      L      XL

Related Links

Media Matters, a report on SFU in the news, is compiled and distributed daily by SFU Public Affairs & Media Relations (PAMR).

WOMEN

Criminologist John Lowman wrote a guest column in today’s Vancouver Sun that said in part: “There is no issue over which feminists are more deeply divided than prostitution. . . . Of course we should help women exit prostitution if they want to. But we should also devise law and policy that help to protect women who do not plan to exit prostitution. The radical-feminist agenda is one of the main obstacles to achieving that goal.” Full story: http://at.sfu.ca/QZvSGe

Meanwhile, Ottawa Citizen columnist Dan Gardner slammed Ottawa for challenging the Ontario court ruling that overturned three of Canada’s prostitution laws. He contended that “most politicians and citizens don't give a damn what happens to prostitutes.” He cited 1966 research (commissioned by Ottawa) done by John Lowman.

“Lowman sent letters to politicians begging them to look at the research. They were ignored. He tried to tell reporters the Pickton story was as much about the law as it was about a serial killer. Mostly, he was ignored. In 2006, a parliamentary subcommittee examined the evidence and all but the Conservative members agreed the status quo 'does more harm than good."'It was ignored.”

Full storyhttp://at.sfu.ca/PcUeMS  It also ran in the Victoria Times Colonist.

The Vancouver Sun talked with lecturer Kathleen Cross of SFU Communication about a new report finding that women are still significantly under-represented and misrepresented in news media coverage despite improvement in last five years.

“This doesn't help deal with women's inequality in the world, because men as experts becomes part of our convention on who appears to be an expert, or what an expert looks like.”

Full storyhttp://at.sfu.ca/rWxWEA .  SFU news release: http://at.sfu.ca/ivQLtf

Postmedia News sent the Sun story to clients across the country, and it promptly ran in the Calgary Herald.

The Vancouver Sun looked at the phenomenon of young women leaping into ponds in their wedding dresses and finding other “creative ways to get wet and dirty in their gowns, sometimes destroying them.”  The paper noted: “Barbara Mitchell a professor of sociology at Simon Fraser University says that traditionally, the white dress represents purity. The requisite white gown may also represent ‘some kind of repressive, constrained uniform that represents conformity.’ Full story: http://at.sfu.ca/JnLjdr

ENVIRONMENT

More media outlets, including The Vancouver Sun, carried versions of yesterday’s story on how, with help from hatcheries in Alaska and Japan, the Pacific ocean is becoming "overcrowded with salmon.” Randall Peterman of SFU’s School of Resource and Environmental Management was quoted.

The research team on which Peterman worked fears trouble for wild salmon, including hatchery fish dominating the ocean, competition for food, and interbreeding of hatchery and wild salmon.

Vancouver Sun story: http://at.sfu.ca/wliush  Peterman also appeared on CFAX Radio, Victoria, and the item ran on A-Channel TV there. And the UK-based science website of PhysOrg.com picked up SFU’s news release. Several blogs addressed the story as well.

(Article in Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamic Management and Ecosystem Science: http://at.sfu.ca/xLoBWT SFU news releasehttp://at.sfu.ca/QSruQf )

CKWX NEWS1130 reported that almost three dozen environmental scientists have written to Premier Gordon Campbell, calling for legislation to protect species at risk in BC. SFU biologist Arne Mooers: "We have the most species, but we also have some of the iconic species that really aren't found any more."

Full story: http://at.sfu.ca/kAFBPp  SFU news release: http://at.sfu.ca/QwzXNr

EDUCATION

Janet Steffenhagen, education reporter for The Vancouver Sun, wrote about tests for kindergarten children aimed at identifying children who might be at risk of learning difficulties. “Although many studies affirm the value of early interventions, a Simon Fraser University professor said there are difficulties with the one-shot approach to screening because children's language, cognitive and social development ‘waxes and wanes over time.’” The prof: Maureen Hoskyn, director of SFU's Centre for Research on Early Child Health and Education.   Full story: http://at.sfu.ca/PfFmhy

SECURITY

International security expert André Gerolymatos, SFU historian, was on CityTV talking about the new “travel alert” covering feared Al-Qaeda terrorism in Europe.  Videohttp://at.sfu.ca/kbtRda

ATHLETICS

SFU History prof Allen Seager had a letter to the editor in The Vancouver Sun on the Canadian history behind the Commonwealth Games. “The original impetus came from Canadian Olympic manager/coach Bobby Robinson, of Hamilton.” The letter: http://at.sfu.ca/IXSqHc

Comments

Commenting is closed
Comment Guidelines
Search SFU News Online