Simon Fraser University


People

Contemporary Arts appoints talented trio

July 23, 2009

As SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts prepares to relocate to its new home at 149 West Hastings St. in downtown Vancouver, three arts-savvy staffers have joined the project’s team.

Sabine Bitter
SABINE BITTER
, curator, Audain Gallery: In addition to her teaching duties in SFU Visual Arts, internationally recognized multi-media artist Bitter will curate the Audain Visual Arts Teaching Gallery, opening in February 2010. The new gallery will exhibit contemporary visual arts and initiate a range of projects in connection with the Audain Visiting Artists program.

Michael Boucher
MICHAEL BOUCHER
, director, cultural development and programming: Boucher is a seasoned director and programmer who has produced several international festivals including the World Stage Festival and International Children’s Festival in Toronto. The native Montrealer will serve as the university’s impresario, coordinating cultural events to ensure SFU at Woodward’s is a dynamic player in Vancouver’s arts scene. His first challenge: to oversee the production of the inaugural program, kicking off with Robert Lepage’s The Blue Dragon/Le Dragon Bleu in February 2010 in SFU’s new Fei and Milton Wong Experimental Theatre.

Vanessa Richards
VANESSA RICHARDS,
director, community engagement: A native Vancouverite who came up through the city’s independent arts and music scene in the 1980s, Richards will help SFU at Woodward’s to fully integrate with the surrounding community through non-academic arts initiatives.

An internationally published poet, jazz musician and cultural facilitator, Richards has earned a reputation both at home and abroad for bold arts initiatives and intercultural collaboration. Richards’ position is funded by a grant from the Vancouver Foundation.

The B.C. government in late 2007 committed $50.3 million to help SFU move its contemporary arts school to the former Woodward’s department store site in the 100 block of West Hasting Street in the city’s Downtown Eastside. The $80-million project will be completed with the generous support of donors. By Julie Ovenell-Carter