Nobel lecture series set for March, April

March 09, 2006, vol. 35, no. 5
By Diane Luckow



Document Tools

Print This Article

E-mail This Page

Font Size
S      M      L      XL

Related Stories

Learn more about the accomplishments of the 2005 Nobel prize winners at Simon Fraser University's annual seven-week Nobel lecture series, held Thursday evenings through March and April at Harbour Centre.

The event is sponsored by the faculty of science and the faculty of arts and social sciences.

The series began March 2 with a lecture from SFU assistant professor of physics Paul Haljan, who spoke about the Nobel prize winners in physics, Roy Glauber, John Hall and Theodor Hansch. On March 9, assistant professor of English Peter Dickinson will discuss Nobel prize in literature winner and playwright Harold Pinter and his work.

On March 23, Bessie Borwein, professor emeritus with the University of Western Ontario, will present a lecture on The Eleven Women Nobel Laureates in the Sciences, 1903-2004. There is no stereotype for these amazing women, she says, and while they all shared a passion for new knowledge, their paths were diverse and difficult.

SFU professor of chemistry Rob Britton, on March 30, will honour 2005 Nobel laureate chemists Yves Chauvin, Robert Grubbs and Richard Schrock, whose discoveries have revolutionized synthetic chemistry and led to the production of many new molecules, including pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers and other products used in daily life. He will talk about their science in his lecture Metathesis: A Chemical Square Dance.

On April 6, professor of economics Arthur Robson will talk about the winners of the Nobel prize in economics - Playing for real - games in theory and in practice. Robert Aumann and Thomas Schellling won the prize for their analysis of interactive decision making and its applications to war, racial segregation and economics.

Does Living With Stress Cause Ulcers? Professor of biology Margo Moore will answer this question in her discussion of the work of the Nobel prize winners in medicine, Barry Marshall and Robin Warren. They were honoured for discovering the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer diseases. It took more than a decade of struggle for the world to accept a bacterial cause of ulcers but now H. pylori is recognized not only as a causative agent of gastritis but also as a major risk factor in the development of gastric cancer.

The last lecture in the series, on April 27, by professor of political science Douglas Ross features the winners of the Nobel peace price, Mohamed ElBaradei and the International Atomic Agency. All lectures take place at SFU Vancouver's Harbour Centre, in the Segal centre room or Fletcher Challenge theatre from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The lectures are free, but reservations are required. Call 604-291-5100.

Search SFU News Online