Simon Fraser University

 

 

 

Teaching

ARISE logo

 

In addition to a wide range of undergraduate courses taught by ARISE members at SFU, we regularly offer 5 graduate courses ranging from Scientific Writing to Ichnology to Petroleum Geology. Below are descriptions of these 5 classes.

EASC 610: Petroleum Geology

Well log Petroleum Geology is an introduction to the practical application of geological and geophysical concepts in the petroleum industry. The course focuses on the use of facies models, porosity and permeability, geophysical logs, drillstem tests, drilling, and production strategies in petroleum exploration and exploitation. Particular emphasis is placed on the geologist's role in the industry, both in discovering new hydrocarbons, and in improving recovery from existing hydrocarbon reservoirs. oics, including: processes of sedimentation, facies model concepts, applications of ichnology, and depositional environments with an emphasis on siliciclastic successions. The focus is on marine and marginal marine settings and deposits. This course is typically held in conjunction with EASC 420, and has both a lecture and lab component. Lectures are powerpoint-based, and labs involve logging subsurface cores, interpreting well logs, and contour mapping. We use petroleum industry software extensively in this class: mainly Accumap (donated by IHS Energy Group).

EASC 611: Advanced Sedimentology

Turbidite Field Trip Advanced Sedimentology teaches graduate students the application of sedimentology and ichnology in facies analysis and in paleo-environmental interpretations. Students are taught a range of tpoics, including: processes of sedimentation, facies model concepts, applications of ichnology, and depositional environments with an emphasis on siliciclastic successions. The focus is on marine and marginal marine settings and deposits. The course is typically held in conjunction with EASC 402, and has both a lecture and lab component. Lectures are powerpoint-based, and labs involve logging subsurface cores in SFU's core research facilities. As part of the course, students go on a 3 day field trip to Salt Spring Island to look at turbidites exposed in outcrop.

EASC 612: Stratigraphy

Stratigraphy Stratigraphy teaches graduate students stratigraphic concepts of lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy and genetic stratigraphy. The course concentrates on genetic stratigraphy, with emphasis on allostratigraphy, genetic stratigraphic sequences and sequence stratigraphy. Students critically assess each paradigm and its applicability to both the subdivision and the interpretation of the sedimentary record. Relative sea level changes and their effects on deposition are discussed in relation to the preserved sedimentary record. Students examine the utility of facies analysis in the various genetic stratigraphic frameworks and the viability of reconstructing the depositional history of sedimentary successions.This course is typically held in conjunction with EASC 312, and has both a lecture and lab component. Lectures are powerpoint-based, and labs involve wgeophysical log and core log correlation exercises.

EASC 622: Principles of Ichnology

Rhizocorallium Principles of Ichnology goes into detail on the use of trace fossils for facies analysis. During this class, students are introdcued to the conceptual framework of ichnology with particular emphasis on neoichnology, the ethological (behavioral) classification of biogenic structures, as well as its applications to the ichnofacies concept and paleoenvironmental interpretation of the sedimentary record. The recognition of organism responses to environmental stresses is integrated with conventional sedimentology to highlight the complex inter-relationships between infauna and the environments they inhabit. The genetic stratigraphic applications of ichnology will also be addressed. EASC 622 is only offered at the graduate student level, and has both a lecture and lab component. Lectures are mainly seminars where students read a sereis of papers each week, and discuss the implications of those papers. Labs involve identifying trace fossils in hand specimens and in subsurface cores in SFU's core research facilities.

EASC 711: Special Topics - Scientific Writing

Scientific Writing Scientific Writing is intened to teach graduate students how to effectively construct a scientific paper. Every two weeks students are assigned papers related to their research topics. They have to read their papers and write a summary article (5 to 7 pages long) on the topic. Students are also expected to give a 20 minute presentation on their topic to the clas. Papers are marked by the instructor. Corrected papers must be resubmitted after incorporating the edits of the instructor. This class is seminar based.