Faculty Development Workshops

CELLTR will continue its popular speaker series in Fall 2018, which welcomes both local and international speakers to share research-informed and practical topics on English language learning, teaching, and support relevant to those who work in multilingual university contexts at SFU and beyond. Please check back for information on upcoming speaker events.

Registration is recommended. These sessions are open to the public for drop-in as well.

Thursday| April 25, 2019
12:30pm – 2pm
1390 West Mall Centre, Burnaby

Register now

10 tips for effective feedbacking* of student writing

Presenters:

Dr. Lee, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University

In this professional development workshop, participants will be introduced to strategies drawn from second language writing research on the “hows” (and “whys”) of providing effective feedback on English as an additional language student writing. Time will also be set aside at the end of the workshop for questions and general discussion about EAL writing feedback. At the end of this workshop, participants will leave with practical tips that:

  • can be applied immediately to their students’ written assignments;
  • may help improve the time-efficacy of the written feedback process;
  • will effectively support EAL students’ language learning through their written assignments.

*further explanation of this term will be discussed at the workshop

Dr. Ena Lee

Dr. Lee is a Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University. Her research interests include critical pedagogy and critical academic literacy, anti-racist education, student and teacher identity, and teacher education in relation to the field of English as a second language.

Friday | April 12, 2019
10am – 11:30 am
1390 West Mall Centre, Burnaby

When commitments to “inclusivity” and “good intentions” are not enough

Presenters:

Dr. Lee, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University

In this professional development workshop, we will unpack notions of “inclusivity” and “good intentions” and discuss the possibilities as well as limitations of both in educational contexts based on theory and evidence-based practice. At the end of this workshop, participants will leave with practical tips thatmay be applied immediately to their classroom praxis and tips that can help foster more equitable classroom communities.

Dr. Ena Lee

Dr. Lee is a Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University. Her research interests include critical pedagogy and critical academic literacy, anti-racist education, student and teacher identity, and teacher education in relation to the field of English as a second language.

* Ena Presentation.pdf
Download the presentation

Tuesday | April 09, 2019
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
1390 West Mall Centre, Burnaby

Teaching to the discipline: Academic literacies and the devolving of English language support

Presenters:

Dr. Neil Murray, Associate Professor, University of Warwick

Since the publication of seminal work on academic literacies in the late 1990s and early 2000s, associated with the outputs of Brian Street, Mary Lea and other scholars, there has been a gradual shift away from a traditional study skills approach to EAP, which sees academic English in more generic terms and as generalizable across discipline areas, to one that recognises the discipline-specific nature of academic discourse. Such discourse is characterised by specialised vocabularies, concepts, and knowledges, as well as particular patterns of meaning-making activity (genres, rhetorical structures, argument formulations, narrative devices, etc.) and ways of contesting meaning. Together, these things are key to defining individual disciplines and by recognising and engaging with them, students become bona fide members of their communities of practice. This lecture will look at the pluralistic notion of academic literacies and argue that because they are fundamental to the discipline, all students need to be conversant in them, not just non-English speaking students. To ensure that this is achieved, tuition in them needs, ideally, to be embedded in the curriculum and taught by ‘regular’ academic content lecturers. A case study of such a process of embedding that was implemented in Australia will be discussed, including the political and administrative institutional hurdles that needed to be overcome, and the challenges involved in the process of implementation. The way in which the discipline-focused nature of provision was supported by EAP tutors and academic developers in the form of complementary student support activities, professional development activities for academic staff, and online resources will be shared.

Wednesday | April 03, 2019
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
1390 West Mall Centre, Burnaby

University English language assessment: What’s going wrong, why, and what’s the solution?

Presenters:

Dr. Neil Murray, Associate Professor, University of Warwick

Higher education has become a truly global enterprise with a resulting increase in student mobility and a change to the student demographic in universities worldwide. In particular, universities are experiencing significant growth in their international student numbers: in 2013, the OECD reported that the number of students enrolled in tertiary education outside their country of citizenship increased more than threefold, from 1.3 million in 1990 to nearly 4.3 million in 2011, representing an average annual growth rate of almost 6%. Among other things, this has placed the spotlight on students’ English language proficiency and the mechanisms – and their effectiveness – via which universities assess students’ language competence both pre- and post-enrolment. It has also called into question the nature and adequacy of English language support services provided by institutions. This talk will look at some of the issues associated with assessing students’ linguistic preparedness for tertiary studies, including the need to understand what we mean by ‘proficiency’ and to what extent gatekeeping tests assess the kind of language competence that students will require once they enter higher education. To that end, a model of language proficiency will be presented, and an argument made for embedding academic literacy in the curriculum. It will look at the implications of this for the provision of English language support for enrolled students and for some form of assessment post-enrolment, and how the latter might be used to determine access to different types of support.

Tuesday | April 02, 2019
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
1390 West Mall Centre, Burnaby

Language Assessment in English for Academic Purposes: Perspectives and Issues

Presenters:

Dr. Keith S. T. Tong, Director, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology 

This talk discusses issues in language assessment in EAP from three perspectives: Applied Linguistics, Language Education, and Educational Management, based on the assessment practice at HKUST. The ELPA (English Language Proficiency Assessment) tests have been developed in the Center for Language Education (CLE) at HKUST and comprises five components: listening, speaking, reading, writing and vocabulary.  A proficiency test by nature, the ELPA tests also serve multiple and often sensitive purposes in specific university contexts.

With postgraduates, since an ELPA test is used as a high-stakes measurement of students’ speaking ability, it faces constant challenges over its construct validity and reliability.  Such a situation also entails much administrative sense and political acumen in communicating the meaning and implications of test results to various stake-holders.

At the same time, the ELPA tests are administered to all Year One undergraduates, with test results holding significance for students’ learning pathways.  Here the challenge lies with developing and managing assessment literacy with a large team of assessors, and with engaging students with feedback, given the close integration planned between language assessment and curriculum development and delivery.

The talk concludes with an elicitation of key considerations and principles for language assessment in EAP. 

Dr. Keith Tong

Dr. Keith Tong has forty years’ experience in language education, teaching at secondary and tertiary levels, and being involved in teacher education in Hong Kong.

He is currently Director of the Center for Language Education at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and is responsible for the development and implementation of language courses for both undergraduates and postgraduates at the university.

He has shared his insights in language learning and teaching on various occasions in Hong Kong, Taiwan and China, and at international conferences, and has served on adjudicating panels of teaching awards.

He speaks English, Cantonese and Putonghua, and is the co-author of Colloquial Cantonese, published by Routledge.  He has a B.A., an M.A., a Cert. Ed., an Adv. Dip. Ed., and a Ph.D. in Educational Management.

Friday | March 29, 2019
12:30 pm – 2 pm
1390 West Mall Centre, Burnaby

 

Problematizing “common sense” discourses of EAL

Presenters:

Dr. Lee, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University

In this workshop, common myths of English as an additional language education will be unpacked through discussion of both theory and evidence-based praxis to illustrate how the perpetuation of “common sense” discourses about EAL can be detrimental both within the classroom and beyond. Participants will leave the workshop with a greater understanding of EAL theory and practice that can help to inform pedagogy and programming that may more effectively support EAL students’ educational experiences and trajectories.

Dr. Ena Lee

Dr. Lee is a Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University. Her research interests include critical pedagogy and critical academic literacy, anti-racist education, student and teacher identity, and teacher education in relation to the field of English as a second language.

* Lee Presentation.pdf
Download the presentation

Thursday | Feb 28, 2019
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
1390 West Mall Centre, Burnaby

Lessons learned: Best practices and principles stemming from university-wide content-based language learning programs

Presenters:

Dr. Jérémie Séror
Director, Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute (OLBI) and Associate Dean, Faculty of Arts, University of Ottawa

As increasingly plurilingual and intercultural spaces, universities face the challenge of redefining traditional approaches used to respond to the presence of multilingual language learners on campuses (Marshall & Moore, 2013). This talk will explore the implications that can be drawn from research on the application of content-based language learning approaches in higher education contexts (Knoerr, Weinberg, & Gohard-Radenkovic, 2016; Lyster & Ballinger, 2011; Soltero, 2018) to create inclusive and supportive spaces that foster both literacy and disciplinary development for such learners.  After reviewing the unique challenges that stem from the increasing presence of students whose dominant literacy practices may differ from those valued in their programs, the presentation will explore specific examples of how university-based content and language integrated learning programs have sought to address such students’ needs.  The talk will examine these programs’ focus on curricular design and pedagogy and their emphasis on a collaborative effort between literacy and disciplinary programs and the instructors that deliver this content to students. A review of best practices stemming from this approach will underscore the training and resources required to support instructors and staff as they navigate changing roles and responsibilities associated to mediating an increasingly blurred divide between the disciplines and language and literacy development. The talk will end by discussing lessons learned about the crucial importance of a university-wide, integrated approach to the successful implementation of content-based language learning programs and the need to address and challenge beliefs, discourses, and practices that can limit language learners’ integration and success in higher education.

References

Knoerr, H., Weinberg, A., & Gohard-Radenkovic, A. (Eds.). (2016). L’immersion française à l'université: Politiques et pédagogies. Ottawa: Les presses de l’Université d’Ottawa

Lyster, R., & Ballinger, S. (2011). Content-based language teaching: Convergent concerns across divergent contexts. Language Teaching Research, 15(3), 279-288.

Marshall, S., & Moore, D. (2013). 2B or not 2B plurilingual? Navigating languages literacies, and plurilingual competence in postsecondary education in Canada. Tesol Quarterly, 47(3), 472-499.

Soltero, S. (2018). Dual language higher education: Post-secondary discipline-based bilingual immersion. In H. Knoerr, A. Weinberg, & C. E. Buchanan (Eds.), Current issues in university immersion (pp. 29-54). Ottawa: Groupe de recherche en immersion au niveau universitaire (GRINU).

Thursday | Feb 7, 2019
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
1390 West Mall Centre, Burnaby

Students’ intercultural experiences in an internationalizing university in Shanghai: A critical discursive perspective

Presenters:

Dr. Carol (Yang) Song
Assistant Professor, Department of English Language and Literature, Fudan University, Shanghai

The present study examines how different discourses on culture and intercultural communication were involved in structuring and shaping intercultural experiences of international students and home students in English-medium-instruction (EMI) Master’s degree programmes in a top-rated comprehensive university in Shanghai, China. The analysis shows that national, municipal and institutional policies and practices play a key role in creating the unique educational spaces in which the students are immersed, and their intercultural experiences are infused with cultural dichotomies saturating the urban and campus spaces under the ‘China Discourse’ publicized by the Chinese government. Instances of interpersonal ‘othering’ among international and home students revolve around multiple axes of differentiation (i.e., political, economic, academic/linguistic and experiential); however, a few student informants have developed critical cosmopolitan mindsets (Appiah 2005; Hannerz 2009; Hawkins 2018). Implications on internationalization of higher education polices are discussed in the context of China.

Dr. Carol (Yang) Song is currently an assistant professor at the Department of English Language and Literature, Fudan University, Shanghai. Her research interest includes internationalization of higher education, identity and intercultural communication, multilingual linguistic landscapes and digital literacies.

* Song Presentation.pdf
Download the presentation slides

Thursday | Jan 24, 2019
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
1390 West Mall Centre, Burnaby

Institutional and pedagogical perspectives on an innovative content-based academic language and literacy curriculum

Presenters:

Dr. Alfredo Ferreira
Lecturer, Academic English Program, UBC Vantage College

This presentation/workshop on content-based academic language and literacy programming begins with an introduction to the Academic English Program at UBC Vantage College (VC). VC is an alternative-entry, first-year program for scholastically well-prepared international students who do not meet UBC’s English language proficiency requirements for direct entry. The mandate and architecture of VC highlight the institutional support in the faculties of Arts, Management, Applied Science, and Science for tailored, innovative content-based language and literacy programming.

To provide participants with an initial understanding and experience of the context-sensitive approach to language and literacy supports of the Academic English program in particular, the facilitator will workshop a tool from the foundational writing course – we call it the Academic Writing Matrix – that sets out the three concurrent functions of language in situated contexts (Humphrey et al, 2010): with language, we represent human experience, enact social identities and relations, and organize messages (Halliday, 1994). These functions are unpacked and illustrated at various levels of granularity relevant to writing across disciplinary contexts, using student questions about their writing as prompts for exploring the explicit, language-based pedagogy. The presentation then moves to illustrate how the approaches to language and tasks in the foundational course are articulated in the more discipline-specific adjunct courses, with a focus on student work, speech genres, and the Science stream.

Participants are invited to stay after the first 60 minutes of the presentation/workshop for up to 30 minutes of questions and discussion.

* Ferreira Presentation.pdf
Download the presentation slides