Alison Beale

Professor

T: 778-782-5160
E: beale@sfu.ca
Room: HC3561

Education

  • BSc, Department, University
  • MSc, Department, University

Currently Teaching

Courses

Future courses may be subject to change.

publications

Books

  • 1998 Ghosts in the Machine: Women and Cultural Policy in Canada and Australia. Co-edited with Dr. Annette Van Den Bosch. Toronto: Garamond Press, 1998. 250 pp.
  • Reviewed in: Media, Culture and Society (21[1] Ja.’99:140-41), Canadian Journal of Communication(23[4],1998), University of Toronto Quarterly (70[1] 2000/01:489-491) Australian Journal of Canadian Studies (16[2]1998), Continuum (13[1]1999), Resources for Feminist Research (28[3/4]2001:74-76)

Articles and Book Chapters

  • 2002a. “Gender and Transversal Cultural Policies” in Global Media Policy in the New Millenium, edited by Marc Raboy. London: University of Luton Press, 199-214.
  • 2002b. “Identifying a Policy Hierarchy: Communication Policy, Media Industries, and Globalization” in Global Culture:Media, Arts, Policy and Globalization edited by Diana Crane,Nobuko Kawashima and Ken’ichi Kawasaki. London and New York: Routledge, 78-89.
  • 1999a. “From ‘Sophie’s Choice’ to Consumer Choice: Framing Gender in Cultural Policy,” Media,Culture and Society 21(2) 435-458.
  • 1999b. “Development and Désétatisation: Cultural Policy in the European Union,” MIA/Culture and Policy Issue #90, 91-105.
  • 1999c. “The Dilettante’s Dilemma: Speaking for the Arts in Canadian Cultural Policy,” in Harold Innis in the New Century: Reflections and Refractions, eds. C. Acland and W. Buxton. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 355-368.
  • 1998a. “Introduction: Australian and Canadian Cultural Policies: A Feminist Perspective,” (with Annette Van Den Bosch), in Beale and Van Den Bosch (eds.) 1-22.
  • 1998b. “Cultural Policy as a Technology of Gender,” in Beale and Van Den Bosch (eds.), 231-250.

research

Globalization and cultural policies; cultural trade, commmunications regulation; feminist research in cultural policy; cultural policy as cultural practice.