Gail Anderson received the Award for Achievement in Forensic Life Sciences (Biology), presented by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS), Pathology/Biology Section.

Achievements

Gail Anderson recognized internationally for achievements as forensic entomologist

February 15, 2017
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Congratulations to Professor Gail Anderson for receiving the Award for Achievement in Forensic Life Sciences (Biology), presented by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS), Pathology/Biology Section at its 2017 annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

The Pathology/Biology Section of the AAFS presents the award only when there is a deserving candidate who has shown high achievement and exemplary excellence in the practice, advancement and teaching of forensic applications in the life sciences.

Anderson received the award for her work as a forensic entomologist – a specialist in the study of insects.

Anderson is dedicated to understanding the relationships between carrion insects and their surroundings, both biotic and abiotic. She has been consulted locally and globally in homicide, wildlife and domestic animal cases due to her innovative research at the Centre for Forensic Research at SFU.

"Gail has many notable achievements as a forensic entomologist. In fact, she was the first and only full time forensic entomologist in Canada until her former graduate student became the second. This award demonstrates Gail's strengths as a researcher on an international scale. She continues to advance the field of entomology through both her teaching and research efforts," says David MacAlister, director of the School of Criminology.

Her current research focuses on better understanding body decomposition in the ocean. She is involved with VENUS (the Victoria Experimental Network Under the Sea), the world’s most advanced, cabled seafloor laboratory, exploring the decomposition of animal carcasses as human proxies.

Anderson was listed as one of the six most influential scientists in British Columbia by the Vancouver Sun in 2015. She has received multiple awards, including most recently, the Dean’s Medal for Academic Excellence, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (2014) and the Burnaby Mountain Endowed Professorship for the second time (2012). She also received the Derome Award from the Canadian Society of Forensic Sciences in 2001.

The AAFS is the main forensic association of the world with several thousand members.