Subscribe to our mailing list to receive event announcements.

Paul Tai Yip Ng Memorial Award

Mr. Peter Eng, family members, friends and colleagues established this fund within the David Lam Centre at Simon Fraser University in 1997 in memory of Mr. Peter Eng’s father, the late Mr. Paul Tai Yip Ng. Presently the fund provides for the annual awarding of a prize to a student who has composed an outstanding paper on intercultural issues, particularly as they apply to people in or from Canada and the Asia Pacific region.

The David See-Chai Lam Centre for International Communication at Simon Fraser University is pleased to announce the Paul Tai Yip Ng Memorial Award for 2018 Best Graduate Student Paper.

Application Deadline: February 1, 2019

Criteria:

The award will be given to the best graduate student research paper that advances our understanding of intercultural issues, particularly as they apply to people in or from Canada and the Asia Pacific region.

  • The paper must have been completed as part of the applicant’s graduate studies at Simon Fraser University in 2018. The maximum number of pages is 30.
  • This award is open to current graduate students from all disciplines at Simon Fraser University. Awardee(s) must agree to attend the award ceremony in Spring 2019.

Terms of the Award:

The winner will be presented a cheque in the amount of $1,200 at the award ceremony in Spring 2019.

How to Submit:

Submissions consisting of the following should be sent to dlcadmin@sfu.ca with Paul Tai Yip Ng Memorial Award in the Subject line by the deadline.

1.  a one-page cover letter from the graduate student expressing his/her intention to submit the paper for this competition; and how the paper advances our understanding of intercultural relations, particularly as they apply to people in or from Canada and the Asia Pacific.
2.  a copy of the graduate student's paper; and
3.  a short nomination letter by the supervising professor or professor who taught the course for which the paper was written. The nomination letter should include the supervising professor’s evaluation of the student’s work.

2017 Winner

Maggie Tsang
Master of Arts Candidate (Humanities); Master of Arts (Philosophy)

Chinese Medicine as Hermeneutic Knowledge? On the Nature of Knowledge of Chinese and Modern Medicine

Abstract

While modern medicine considers the human body as a biological system that can be studied in the same objective manner as other physical objects, Chinese medicine has a fundamentally different worldview. Chinese medicine views the human body, not simply as a biological system, but as a holistic microcosm, whose health depends on maintaining harmonious function at the level of internal microcosm and in relation to wider context understood as parallel macrocosm. Without denying the success of natural science, philosophers have developed alternative epistemological conceptions that aim to better capture the nature of knowledge specifically related to human phenomena. Wilhelm Dilthey draws a distinction between understanding (Verstehen) and explanation (Erklären) as the specific form of knowing in human and natural sciences respectively. In contrast to positivistic knowledge of natural sciences, knowledge in human sciences is essentially hermeneutic in nature, knowledge that involves interpretation and understanding that takes into account variant contexts and perspectives. The hermeneutic conception offers a promising framework for understanding the nature of Chinese medicine and explaining the role of Chinese medical classics.