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3MT: Kimberly Nickel

May 16, 2016
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SFU's Three Minute Thesis (3MT) finals took place on March 14, 2016. Kimberly Nickel, Education, spoke on "Professional Goalkeeper: The Criminal Justice Practica Supervisor". Supervisor: Dr. Becky Cox.

Developing, implementing, and analyzing the professional development of students in the criminal justice field are Kim’s primary responsibilities. She is a detailed-oriented, high energy professional coach with the ability to motivate students to work at optimum levels while maintaining a comfortable, creative environment, and keeping a clear perspective of the learning goals to be accomplished. She can achieve this goal by linking students to committed professionals in the field while providing ongoing supervision and mentorship.

Before joining the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice Kim worked for the City of Surrey developing programs for at risk individuals. Through rapport building and active listening techniques, she has encouraged people involved in risky behaviours to adopt more positive lifestyles. In addition she has planned many public forms with the goal of establishing achievable strategic plans.

Dissertation Focus:

Practica supervisors play a critical role in experiential learning. While practica differs dramatically depending on the program of study, the literature, primarily in the areas of social work, education and nursing, centres around four key functions that are commonly expected of supervisors and include: support, education, and administration while acting as guardians for the(ir) fields. Assumptions are made that supervisors will link theory to practice while teaching specific skills, perform administrative duties, and support students as gatekeepers of their profession. Practica literature can be further divided into two areas examining the satisfaction students have of their supervisors as students “do” and/or “think” during practica. Although satisfaction may relate to motivation it has limited applicability to understanding learning goals of practica supervisors. Existing research in social work, education, and nursing may have even less applicability to the far less researched, and ever expanding, undergraduate arts practica hosted by criminal justice programs that are expanding and unregulated by external professional bodies (unlike the professional regulation of education/teachers, social worker, and nurses). Despite this expanding reliance on undergraduate arts practica, little is known about the role, responsibilities, and activities of undergraduate arts/criminal justice practicum supervisors. To understand practica learning goals, in undergraduate arts programs, it becomes critical to examine the goals of practica held by supervisors. For criminal justice programs offering practica, supervisors are relied upon to be professional gatekeepers, educators, and mentors that connect social justice principals to practical experience. Little is know about the challenges supervisors face when reconciling these often competing goals. As such, how do criminal justice practica supervisors conceive of practica learning goals? Criminal justice practicum supervisors from governmental (ie federal corrections/police), private (investigations), and non-profit agencies (homeless services providers/advocacy organizations) will be invited to participate in interviews in an effort to understand their challenges and goals for practical based learning for students. This research will (ideally) work to support supervisors in their expanding role of preparing undergraduate students for the field.

Links

LinkedIn: Kimberly Nickel

SFU's Three Minute Thesis (3MT) finals took place on March 14, 2016. Kimberly Nickel, Education, spoke on "Professional Goalkeeper: The Criminal Justice Practica Supervisor". Supervisor: Dr. Becky Cox.
 

implementing and analyzing the professional development of students in the criminal justice field are Kim’s primary responsibilities. She is a detailed-oriented, high energy professional coach with the ability to motivate students to work at optimum levels while maintaining a comfortable, creative environment, and keeping a clear perspective of the learning goals to be accomplished. She can achieve this goal by linking students to committed professionals in the field while providing ongoing supervision and mentorship.

Before joining the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice Kim worked for the City of Surrey developing programs for at risk individuals. Through rapport building and active listening techniques, she has encouraged people involved in risky behaviours to adopt more positive lifestyles. In addition she has planned many public forms with the goal of establishing achievable strategic plans.

Dissertation Focus:

Practica supervisors play a critical role in experiential learning. While practica differs dramatically depending on the program of study, the literature, primarily in the areas of social work, education and nursing, centres around four key functions that are commonly expected of supervisors and include: support, education, and administration while acting as guardians for the(ir) fields. Assumptions are made that supervisors will link theory to practice while teaching specific skills, perform administrative duties, and support students as gatekeepers of their profession. Practica literature can be further divided into two areas examining the satisfaction students have of their supervisors as students “do” and/or “think” during practica. Although satisfaction may relate to motivation it has limited applicability to understanding learning goals of practica supervisors. Existing research in social work, education, and nursing may have even less applicability to the far less researched, and ever expanding, undergraduate arts practica hosted by criminal justice programs that are expanding and unregulated by external professional bodies (unlike the professional regulation of education/teachers, social worker, and nurses). Despite this expanding reliance on undergraduate arts practica, little is known about the role, responsibilities, and activities of undergraduate arts/criminal justice practicum supervisors. To understand practica learning goals, in undergraduate arts programs, it becomes critical to examine the goals of practica held by supervisors. For criminal justice programs offering practica, supervisors are relied upon to be professional gatekeepers, educators, and mentors that connect social justice principals to practical experience. Little is know about the challenges supervisors face when reconciling these often competing goals. As such, how do criminal justice practica supervisors conceive of practica learning goals? Criminal justice practicum supervisors from governmental (ie federal corrections/police), private (investigations), and non-profit agencies (homeless services providers/advocacy organizations) will be invited to participate in interviews in an effort to understand their challenges and goals for practical based learning for students. This research will (ideally) work to support supervisors in their expanding role of preparing undergraduate students for the field.

Links

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

One take, one static slide, no props.
Just 3 minutes and the power of the spoken word.

3MT is an unparalleled interdisciplinary opportunity for you to hear about the interesting research that's taking place around the university, as well as to pick up some presentation techniques from some of the best graduate student presenters at SFU — and all in 3-minute segments.

SFU's Three Minute Thesis (3MT) finals took place on March 14, 2016. Kimberly Nickel, Education, spoke on "Professional Goalkeeper: The Criminal Justice Practica Supervisor". Supervisor: Dr. Becky Cox.
 

implementing and analyzing the professional development of students in the criminal justice field are Kim’s primary responsibilities. She is a detailed-oriented, high energy professional coach with the ability to motivate students to work at optimum levels while maintaining a comfortable, creative environment, and keeping a clear perspective of the learning goals to be accomplished. She can achieve this goal by linking students to committed professionals in the field while providing ongoing supervision and mentorship.

Before joining the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice Kim worked for the City of Surrey developing programs for at risk individuals. Through rapport building and active listening techniques, she has encouraged people involved in risky behaviours to adopt more positive lifestyles. In addition she has planned many public forms with the goal of establishing achievable strategic plans.

Dissertation Focus:

Practica supervisors play a critical role in experiential learning. While practica differs dramatically depending on the program of study, the literature, primarily in the areas of social work, education and nursing, centres around four key functions that are commonly expected of supervisors and include: support, education, and administration while acting as guardians for the(ir) fields. Assumptions are made that supervisors will link theory to practice while teaching specific skills, perform administrative duties, and support students as gatekeepers of their profession. Practica literature can be further divided into two areas examining the satisfaction students have of their supervisors as students “do” and/or “think” during practica. Although satisfaction may relate to motivation it has limited applicability to understanding learning goals of practica supervisors. Existing research in social work, education, and nursing may have even less applicability to the far less researched, and ever expanding, undergraduate arts practica hosted by criminal justice programs that are expanding and unregulated by external professional bodies (unlike the professional regulation of education/teachers, social worker, and nurses). Despite this expanding reliance on undergraduate arts practica, little is known about the role, responsibilities, and activities of undergraduate arts/criminal justice practicum supervisors. To understand practica learning goals, in undergraduate arts programs, it becomes critical to examine the goals of practica held by supervisors. For criminal justice programs offering practica, supervisors are relied upon to be professional gatekeepers, educators, and mentors that connect social justice principals to practical experience. Little is know about the challenges supervisors face when reconciling these often competing goals. As such, how do criminal justice practica supervisors conceive of practica learning goals? Criminal justice practicum supervisors from governmental (ie federal corrections/police), private (investigations), and non-profit agencies (homeless services providers/advocacy organizations) will be invited to participate in interviews in an effort to understand their challenges and goals for practical based learning for students. This research will (ideally) work to support supervisors in their expanding role of preparing undergraduate students for the field.

Links

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

One take, one static slide, no props.
Just 3 minutes and the power of the spoken word.

3MT is an unparalleled interdisciplinary opportunity for you to hear about the interesting research that's taking place around the university, as well as to pick up some presentation techniques from some of the best graduate student presenters at SFU — and all in 3-minute segments.

SFU's Three Minute Thesis (3MT) finals took place on March 14, 2016. Kimberly Nickel, Education, spoke on "Professional Goalkeeper: The Criminal Justice Practica Supervisor". Supervisor: Dr. Becky Cox.
 

implementing and analyzing the professional development of students in the criminal justice field are Kim’s primary responsibilities. She is a detailed-oriented, high energy professional coach with the ability to motivate students to work at optimum levels while maintaining a comfortable, creative environment, and keeping a clear perspective of the learning goals to be accomplished. She can achieve this goal by linking students to committed professionals in the field while providing ongoing supervision and mentorship.

Before joining the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice Kim worked for the City of Surrey developing programs for at risk individuals. Through rapport building and active listening techniques, she has encouraged people involved in risky behaviours to adopt more positive lifestyles. In addition she has planned many public forms with the goal of establishing achievable strategic plans.

Dissertation Focus:

Practica supervisors play a critical role in experiential learning. While practica differs dramatically depending on the program of study, the literature, primarily in the areas of social work, education and nursing, centres around four key functions that are commonly expected of supervisors and include: support, education, and administration while acting as guardians for the(ir) fields. Assumptions are made that supervisors will link theory to practice while teaching specific skills, perform administrative duties, and support students as gatekeepers of their profession. Practica literature can be further divided into two areas examining the satisfaction students have of their supervisors as students “do” and/or “think” during practica. Although satisfaction may relate to motivation it has limited applicability to understanding learning goals of practica supervisors. Existing research in social work, education, and nursing may have even less applicability to the far less researched, and ever expanding, undergraduate arts practica hosted by criminal justice programs that are expanding and unregulated by external professional bodies (unlike the professional regulation of education/teachers, social worker, and nurses). Despite this expanding reliance on undergraduate arts practica, little is known about the role, responsibilities, and activities of undergraduate arts/criminal justice practicum supervisors. To understand practica learning goals, in undergraduate arts programs, it becomes critical to examine the goals of practica held by supervisors. For criminal justice programs offering practica, supervisors are relied upon to be professional gatekeepers, educators, and mentors that connect social justice principals to practical experience. Little is know about the challenges supervisors face when reconciling these often competing goals. As such, how do criminal justice practica supervisors conceive of practica learning goals? Criminal justice practicum supervisors from governmental (ie federal corrections/police), private (investigations), and non-profit agencies (homeless services providers/advocacy organizations) will be invited to participate in interviews in an effort to understand their challenges and goals for practical based learning for students. This research will (ideally) work to support supervisors in their expanding role of preparing undergraduate students for the field.

Links

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

One take, one static slide, no props.
Just 3 minutes and the power of the spoken word.

3MT is an unparalleled interdisciplinary opportunity for you to hear about the interesting research that's taking place around the university, as well as to pick up some presentation techniques from some of the best graduate student presenters at SFU — and all in 3-minute segments.

SFU's Three Minute Thesis (3MT) finals took place on March 14, 2016. Kimberly Nickel, Education, spoke on "Professional Goalkeeper: The Criminal Justice Practica Supervisor". Supervisor: Dr. Becky Cox.
 

implementing and analyzing the professional development of students in the criminal justice field are Kim’s primary responsibilities. She is a detailed-oriented, high energy professional coach with the ability to motivate students to work at optimum levels while maintaining a comfortable, creative environment, and keeping a clear perspective of the learning goals to be accomplished. She can achieve this goal by linking students to committed professionals in the field while providing ongoing supervision and mentorship.

Before joining the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice Kim worked for the City of Surrey developing programs for at risk individuals. Through rapport building and active listening techniques, she has encouraged people involved in risky behaviours to adopt more positive lifestyles. In addition she has planned many public forms with the goal of establishing achievable strategic plans.

Dissertation Focus:

Practica supervisors play a critical role in experiential learning. While practica differs dramatically depending on the program of study, the literature, primarily in the areas of social work, education and nursing, centres around four key functions that are commonly expected of supervisors and include: support, education, and administration while acting as guardians for the(ir) fields. Assumptions are made that supervisors will link theory to practice while teaching specific skills, perform administrative duties, and support students as gatekeepers of their profession. Practica literature can be further divided into two areas examining the satisfaction students have of their supervisors as students “do” and/or “think” during practica. Although satisfaction may relate to motivation it has limited applicability to understanding learning goals of practica supervisors. Existing research in social work, education, and nursing may have even less applicability to the far less researched, and ever expanding, undergraduate arts practica hosted by criminal justice programs that are expanding and unregulated by external professional bodies (unlike the professional regulation of education/teachers, social worker, and nurses). Despite this expanding reliance on undergraduate arts practica, little is known about the role, responsibilities, and activities of undergraduate arts/criminal justice practicum supervisors. To understand practica learning goals, in undergraduate arts programs, it becomes critical to examine the goals of practica held by supervisors. For criminal justice programs offering practica, supervisors are relied upon to be professional gatekeepers, educators, and mentors that connect social justice principals to practical experience. Little is know about the challenges supervisors face when reconciling these often competing goals. As such, how do criminal justice practica supervisors conceive of practica learning goals? Criminal justice practicum supervisors from governmental (ie federal corrections/police), private (investigations), and non-profit agencies (homeless services providers/advocacy organizations) will be invited to participate in interviews in an effort to understand their challenges and goals for practical based learning for students. This research will (ideally) work to support supervisors in their expanding role of preparing undergraduate students for the field.

Links

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

One take, one static slide, no props.
Just 3 minutes and the power of the spoken word.

3MT is an unparalleled interdisciplinary opportunity for you to hear about the interesting research that's taking place around the university, as well as to pick up some presentation techniques from some of the best graduate student presenters at SFU — and all in 3-minute segments.

One take, one static slide, no props.
Just 3 minutes and the power of the spoken word.

3MT is an unparalleled interdisciplinary opportunity for you to hear about the interesting research that's taking place around the university, as well as to pick up some presentation techniques from some of the best graduate student presenters at SFU — and all in 3-minute segments.

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