Photo Contest #1 Submissions: Show Us Your Research

Winning Submissions

First Place & People's Choice

A Summer Spent in the Company of Seabirds

"My research takes place on Triangle Island, home to British Columbia’s largest and most diverse seabird colony. Each summer, I return to this remote and uninhabited island to study the at-sea movements of various seabird species using GPS trackers. Here, a group of tufted puffins socialize outside their nesting burrows before flying out to sea on their next foraging trip."

Alice Domalik, Master of Science, Biology

Photo taken in Triangle Island, British Columbia

Second Place

Arctic Blanket Toss

"My research focuses on the topic of microplastic pollution in the Canadian western arctic. I am specifically investigating whether or not there is microplastic contamination in the Beluga whale food web. Beluga whales (and their prey) are important both culturally, and as important food sources for many Inuvialuit people living in Tuktoyaktuk. This photo was taken of me in Tuktoyaktuk, after spending several weeks completing my field work and connecting with the community.  I am participating in a traditional blanket toss, where one is thrown high up in the air on a canvas held by the community. The original purpose of blanket tosses is to celebrate the end of the whaling season. This day, we were celebrating the beginning of an expedition that myself and some members of the community were taking part in. It was really special for me to be able to take part in this tradition."

Rhiannon Moore, MSc, Biology

Photo taken in Tuktoyaktuk, NWT

Third Place

A bloody good job

"This is me feeding our lab's mosquito colony. Since the species we work with, Aedes aegypti, is extremely anthropophilic, the colony remains much healthier if fed on human blood! I choose to share this photo as it represents an important part of our work – keeping the animals we work with alive and thriving so we can continue to study them, uncovering why these mosquitoes are such great vectors for viruses like Zika, dengue and yellow fever."

Heather Coatsworth, PhD,  Biological Sciences

Photo taken at SFU

Honourable Mention

Steps to Knowledge

"As my degree is focused on the the materiality of books, this picture--which shows books as being used solely for their materiality, would be appropriate."

Alexandra Xanthoudakis, Master of Publishing

Photo taken in Venice, Italy

Honourable Mention

Dancing with Shark

"This precious shark in the center of this picture is called Carcharhinus Longimanus, whose habitat is Red Sea in Egypt. As a ferocious but attractive fish, this shark always has many admirers swimming around it for its protection. To closely conduct the research on the relationship between human and marine organism, I travelled thousands of miles to observe these endangered features. I believe that marine organism is not supposed to appear on our dining-table. Conversely, we should swim with them under peaceful ocean."

Yiyao Zhang, MSc in Finance

Photo taken in Red Sea in Egypt

Honourable Mention

Devastation

"My research explores the transformation of defecation habits and politics of sanitation in post-earthquake Nepal. This photo is from my research site in rural Dolakha district. It captures devastation, chaos and uncertainty in the aftermath of the 2015 earthquakes. Whereas in the foreground, everything except the door of an outhouse toilet has fallen, the background shows a devastated home waiting to be rebuilt. On the day when I took this photo, a non-governmental organization had arrived in this area to distribute materials—cement, toilet pan, septic pipes—for toilet building as part of their post-disaster sanitation program."

Bicram Rijal, PhD, Anthropology

Photo taken in Nepal

More Submissions

Lost, In her world!

"We currently study intercultural communication, and taking this photo was really great experience of intercultural communication. I was visiting one interior village in India. And she lived at that village. We had bit conversation in train about her life in village. And she was missing her son, who went to city to get job. And this photo express that feel."

Param Joshi, Professional Master of Engineering

Photo taken in India

Home

"I’ve experienced an overwhelming pull – specifically, around the notion of home – that has previously led me in fragments into many worlds, stories, and timelines. Recently, I have been attempting to define contemplation through a new lens: by choosing to focus qualitatively on my own concept of home through uninhibited attention, and by turning the camera – a frequently used tool in my life for documenting and highlighting spectacular and extraordinary moments in the lives of others – inward and onto the spectacularly ordinary components of my own present life. I am learning to be still. I am learning to be home."

Irina Kosoric, Master of Education in Contemplative Inquiry

Insight into the life of a seabird

"We know very little about the life of seabirds while they’re away from their island breeding colonies. My research uses miniaturized GPS loggers to identify important at-sea habitat of Cassin’s auklets, a little known but imperilled seabird found in British Columbia. Here, we recapture a Cassin’s auklet, eager to learn where it travelled during its previous foraging trip."

Alice Domalik, Master of Science, Biology

Photo taken in Triangle Island, British Columbia

The bridge

"This photo was taken during my field trip in 2014 for the reasearch titled 'Assessing the Impact of Rural-Urban Migration  and Environment-Induced Resettlement Programs on Rural Development in The Context of The National Target Program on New Rural Development' . The photo portrayed the common bridge in most villages in the Mekong Delta in Vietnam."

Thuy Do, Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies

Photo taken in Lac village, Thu Thua District, Long An province, Vietnam

The road

"This photo was taken during my field trip in 2014 for the reasearch titled 'Assessing the Impact of Rural-Urban Migration  and Environment-Induced Resettlement Programs on Rural Development in The Context of The National Target Program on New Rural Development' . The photo portrayed the common roads in most villages in the Mekong Delta in Vietnam."

Thuy Do, Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies

Photo taken in Lac village, Thu Thua District, Long An province, Vietnam

Condo-garden

"I'm doing a business research. I'm going to establish my company after the graduation. The idea is: to give the opportunity to those who love nature, but don't have possibility to enjoy it often. People who live in small condo without any assess to the land for private gardening. My company is going to help those people to have a private "garden" at their balconies. This is our first work!"

Aina Aliieva, MBA, Management of Technology

Photo taken in New Westminster

Bright and Catchy

"I'm doing a business research. I'm going to establish my company after the graduation. The idea is: to give the opportunity to those who love nature, but don't have possibility to enjoy it often. People who live in small condo without any assess to the land for private gardening. My company is going to help those people to have a private "garden" at their balconies. I'm thinking if it's possible to grow this type of flowers at the balcony."

Aina Aliieva, MBA, Management of Technology

Photo taken in New Westminster

Lovely and Pretty

"I'm doing a business research. I'm going to establish my company after the graduation. The idea is: to give the opportunity to those who love nature, but don't have possibility to enjoy it often. People who live in small condo without any assess to the land for private gardening. My company is going to help those people to have a private "garden" at their balconies. I'm experimenting with this type of flowers at the balcony"

Aina Aliieva, MBA, Management of Technology

Photo taken in New Westminster

Strange & Dangerous

"This is a photo of me and a recent embroidery project. I have been exploring embroidery as a from of study, creating a methodology called Stitch Theory, which interacts with ideas around gift economies, extended temporalities and reciprocal forms of devotion and which involves embroidering quotes from academic and poetic texts and gifting them back to the scholar or writer who wrote them. This particular piece features something said to me by my father, British sculptor Walter Bailey."

Storm Greenwood, Comparative Media Arts MA

Photo taken in London, UK

Precious cargo

"This photo was taken after a cold and exhausting 12-hour day in the field. I was collecting sediment cores from lakes in the Mackenzie River Delta, Western Canadian Arctic for my M.Sc. thesis project. It was quite the feat as we managed to collect cores from 12 different lakes. I remember wanting to give up half way through the day but I pushed through. I’ve never felt more accomplished or proud of myself after getting into the helicopter for our flight back to the base surrounded by my sediment cores. Precious cargo, indeed!"

Kimberley Anne Geeves, MSc, Geography

Photo taken in Inuvik, NWT, Canada

The Inuit way

"In this picture, I, Nataasa, am the witness of change in Nunavik, Northern Quebec. The sun is shining on the community. However, big changes are happening. The Arctic seems untouched even though the People, the Inuit, are experiencing major cultural and linguistic upheavals. The purpose of my research is to bring to light the beauty of the Inuit culture with all its cultural and linguistic complexity. In other words, what does it mean to be Inuk today and how do Inuit construct their plurilingual and pluricultural identities and competencies in a globalized world marked by migratory movements, when ancestral values and Inuktitut come into strong contact with the dominant languages of French and English?"

Natacha Roudeix, Languages, Cultures and Literacies, Education

Photo taken in Kuujjuaq, Quebec, Canada

Art of tiling

"I worked on a presentation on Public Art in the first semester. I was confused about whether or not this tiling could be a public art. This spring when I looked up and see the impressive masterpiece again, I find out that absolutely it influences every observer."

Sara Rasooli, Urban Studies

Photo taken in Isfahan, Iran

Pedestrian's View

"I am working on a paper with the subject in pedestrian walkways. It has a part on the history of cities when they were walking cities. Being in one of these cities and see what pedestrians were seen those days was amazing. These days the majority of landscapes are towers. We can not see the sky and roof lines anymore."

Sara Rasooli, Urban Studies

Photo taken in Vienna, Austria

The Mine’s Mine

"Sechelt is not only the largest sand and gravel mine in Canada, but also a scenic and indigenous area, where the community sits less than half kilometer from the mine. Like Sechelt, many communities are subject to potential environmental and social risks that arise from nearby mining operations, be they indigenous or non-indigenous, in developed or developing countries. How should mining projects be governed? How can mines be developed sustainably in a way that respect community rights and minimize environmental impacts? How can mining companies preclude conflicts with communities through discovering mutual interests? My research seeks to answer these questions."

Shuna Ho, PhD,  Business Administration

Photo taken in Sechelt

Fragile and powerful

"Under its beautiful fragile appearance hides an amazing strong creature that is capable of covering thousands of kilometers to survive and to give life. Woman of the Romantic period was considered as a man’s property—a beautiful addition to her husband. Her reputation and position in the society could be erased forever by the man’s desire to sense her beauty. George Eliot, Jane Austen, Mary Wollstonecraft, Bronte sisters are among the most powerful voices of all times who were able to write thousands of words changing the minds and rights of the generations to follow."

Linara Kolosova, English Literature, MA

Sandstone Kaleidoscope

"A crossed-polar, 40x picture of a thin section through a Jurassic sandstone from the Gulf Islands. 160 million years ago, this was deposited on a storm-swept beach, an environment similar to the modern coastline of the Fraser delta. Compaction, high temperatures, and chemical alteration at extreme burial depths (several kilometers) have since altered many of the minerals in the sands, creating the psychedelic colours you cansee in the sample today."

Chuqiao Huang, Geology

Photo taken at TASC 2, SFU

Fuel for flight

"A mixed flock of dunlin and western sandpipers are captured in mid-flight as they descend on the mudflat at Roberts Bank, B.C., to feed on biofilm. I study the relationship between western sandpipers, small migratory shorebirds, and biofilm. A recent discovery, biofilm provides an important food source to fuel the westerns’ remaining 3,000 km flight to their Arctic breeding grounds. As an ecologist, I study the behaviour of these small shorebirds and when looking at this photo I get to see the mudflat through their eyes!"

Rachel Canham, Biology

Photo taken in Robert Bank, B.C. Canada

Young sneaker resellers displaying goods at Hype City 3 streetwear convention

"My research is focused on how Metro Vancouver young sneaker enthusiasts, also known as “sneakerheads,” participate in the reselling of rare and highly sought-after sneakers. Usually these sneakers resell for more than retail price, often 2-8 times higher. Through my ethnographic research, I do participant-observation at virtual and physical spaces of sneaker trading. Through this research, I ask how a presumably mundane clothing item, as sneakers, becomes the object of fantasy and enchantment among an active community of consumers. This was taken at a local streetwear convention Hypecity 3 in Vancouver."

Michelle La, Anthropology

Photo taken in Vancouver, British Columbia

Wilmer Wetland Reflections

"This area is within the Wilmer unit of the Columbia National Wildlife Area managed by the Canadian Wildlife Service. Secretive marshbird surveys have been conducted in the Columbia Wetlands region for the past few years, focusing on species which rely on the wetlands to breed but are seldom seen. We are continuing the bird surveys this year and I have been collecting aquatic invertebrate samples at the survey sites as well. I was hiking towards a survey site and saw this calm moment over the water, a beautiful reflection of the sky and surrounding landscape."

Ashleigh Westphal, Ecological Restoration

Photo taken in Wetlands near Wilmer, BC

Wary Osprey

"Bird surveys have been conducted in the Columbia Wetlands region for the past few years. Osprey are one of the secondary species in the survey and it is amazing to see them soaring over the wetlands. We are continuing the bird surveys this year and I have been collecting aquatic invertebrate samples at the survey sites as well. I was walking towards a survey site and surprised this adult. It eyed me nervously before settling back down onto the nest."

Ashleigh Westphal, Ecological Restoration

Photo taken along Highway 95 in the Columbia Wetlands, BC

Coffee and graphs

"It's hard to share the beauty of mathematics research with others. It's not a world many non-mathematicians get exposed to. But often times it's as simple as some drawings, some ideas, and some coffee. And then a computer so you can write it up nicely."

Stefan Hannie, Mathematics

Rebuilding

"This photo is from my research site in rural Dolakha district in Nepal. Taken a year after the devastating earthquakes of 2015, which killed approximately 9000 people, it captures post-disaster hope and rebuilding. The photo shows a bulldozer reconstructing the earthquake-damaged road that was once connecting the remote mountainous villages with the outside world until the earthquakes destroyed sections of it. The damage to this road and its slow rebuilding meant that the ongoing construction of a nearly-completed 456-megawatt hydroelectric project in Tamakoshi river (seen in the photo) was halted for almost one and half years following the earthquakes."

Bicram Rijal, PhD, Anthropology

Photo taken in Nepal

Aftermath

"The text in this photo reads: Orang Health Post, Dolakha. This photo depicts an aftermath of callous earthquakes of 2015 in a remote village in Dolakha district of Nepal. While the rebuilding of the devastated health post was uncertain for at least an immediate future, the health staff delivered their services from under a tent. For the villagers from health post’s catchment area, it would take them about half a day walk to get to the nearest location for better health service. Many health posts in the district were in similar situation even a year after the earthquakes."

Bicram Rijal, PhD, Anthropology

Photo taken in Nepal

Flooded Amazon Forests

"My research examines the importance of placed-based, experiential education for cultivating an environmental ethic. I have travelled to the Amazon three times as part of my research, and also as an instructor for Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Amazon Field School. This photo shows the unforgettable experience students have during this field school, which often brings forth transformational changes in their lives. Experiencing the wonders of the Amazon gets embedded in who you are, and inspires who you want to be in the world."

Lee Beavington, Education

Photo taken in the Amazon Rainforest, Colombia

Nature as Teacher

"My research examines the importance of place-based, experiential education for cultivating an environmental ethic. Part of this involves direct sensorial engagement with the natural world. In my research, I have students find and sit with leaves. They use all of their senses to engage with their leaf, ponder on several questions in relation to the leaf, and then journal their experiences. From their journaling, students then create a collaborative poem. The result offers a reciprocal insight into our relationship with the natural world, a more Goethean approach to science that complements the objective observation of conventional science education."

Lee Beavington, Education

Photo taken in Mayne Island, BC

Forest Adventures

"This photo shows the sense of discovery and wonder that the natural world can inspire in learners. My research examines the impact of outdoor education on fostering a stewardship for nature. In order to understand and care for another subject, you must first develop a relationship with that subject. Time outside can allow this to happen. The increased use of screen-based devices and urbanization can limit our exposure to the natural world. Yet this exposure, my research argues, is vital to cultivate an environmental ethic."

Lee Beavington, Education

Photo taken in Salt Spring Island, BC

Living with Research

As an interaction design research lab, our studio focuses on people's long-term living experience with the design artifact deployed in their houses. During the ideation and prototyping process for this kaleidoscope project, I put all related materials in the room I work inside every day, trying to live and be immersed in the research environment.  Oftentimes, we take photos with a clear focus on one person or object. However, the perspective of this photo aims to emphasize not only the surrounding environment but also the ultimate research goal, which is always the driving force behind success."

Amy Yo Sue Chen, PhD, School of Interactive Arts & Technology

Photo taken in Everyday Design Studio at Surrey campus