Why Participate

The 3 Minute Thesis gives you a fun opportunity to talk about your research in a supportive and engaging environment. Benefits to students:

  • Improve your presentation skills
  • Share your work and make connections with other SFU graduate students
  • Develop knowledge translation strategies for your research 
  • Have a ready answer next time a relative asks about your work

Competitions to communicate your research are a great way to get noticed and build your professional skills. In addition, our research funders are looking for students with strong skills in knowledge translation. See University AffairsContests to communicate research gain in popularity.

Related contests (open to international students as well):

I wanted to let you know about a phone call I had today. A previous contact was looking for information on my work, and Googled my name. He found the 3MT video and watched it, and shared it at his office. The company he works for is now asking if I would be interested in consulting with them, and if there are other people in my department with similar skills.

His comment was that it was excellent advertising for me, as well as excellent marketing for my research lab, and for our whole department.

— Mary Ann Middleton, 3MT 2013 competitor

Three Minute Thesis – 2018 SFU Finals 

Watch the videos from the SFU Finals

First Place and People's Choice Winner: 

  • Danielle Hoefele, Biological Sciences master’s student: European fire ant foraging and communication

Second Place Winner:

  • Brea McCauley, Archaeology master's student: Ritualized Finger Amputation in the Classic Maya

Danielle will compete at the Western Regional Competition at the University of Regina on April 27, 2018. Good luck, Danielle!

All of the presentations were informative and interesting. Thank you to all who competed this year, including:

  • Alison Butler, Public Policy master's student: Room to grow: Building better rental stock for Vancouver families
  • Allison Carter, Health Sciences doctoral student: Desires embraced: A critical analysis of sex, love, and relationships among women living with HIV
  • Shaun Fickling, Engineering Science doctoral student: Brain vital signs after concussions
  • Ankit Gupta, Interactive Arts and Technology doctoral student: How can wearable technology support self-management of Arthritis?
  • Michelle La, Sociology & Antrhopology master's student: Sneakerheads and their practices of trading
  • Gioachino Roberti, Earth Sciences doctoral student: Volcanoes in a changing climate
  • April Wang, Computing Sciences master’s student: How modern learning resources fail conversational programmers
  • Matthea Wiebe, Archaeology master's student: Exploring Neanderthal Fire-Starting technologies through microarchaeology