Bilingual Corner 2015

Identity Construction of International Students

 

Most international students regard their study abroad experiences to be enlightening and definable periods of their lives.  Canada is now ranked by the UNESCO Institute of Statistics as the 7th most popular destination worldwide for international students. This comment exposes research aimed at investigating Chinese international graduate students in Canada from the perspective of potential immigrants, thus examining them under the framework of transnationalism/ cosmopolitanism, trying to unravel their social experiences and how it affects their identity construction and life trajectory afterwards.

 

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Bridging the Language Gap

In order to promote justice, students from the Legal Interpretation and Translation Certificate Program1 of Simon Fraser University are now helping clients who have difficulties to communicate in English access a free summary legal advisory service provided by lawyers from the Access Pro Bono Society of BC in downtown Vancouver. 

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Patients' Voice: The Expectation of the New Era

A contemporary issue in the health care system is how to manage and deal with chronic illness given the increasing costs of health care and the efforts to keep patients out of hospitals whenever possible. A recent trend is to offer services in a way that patients can take ownership of their own health condition, and physicians and health professionals can help patients through this process of personal care management. In this process, which is called patient-centred care (PCC), patients’ needs and life context are prioritized in the process of consulting, diagnosis, and treatment (e.g., Mead & Bower, 2002). In this approach, patient and physician engage in a dialogue that involves the patient’s perspective, knowledge, experience, life context, and other health-related conditions. However, it is unclear to what extent Canada’s health care providers fulfill their mission of patient-centred care. More specifically there is no evidence that health professionals and physicians in particular routinely apply the PCC approach in their practice after they receive their license. It appears that the needs and voice of the patients are missing in the health care system.

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Inclusive Education? The New Face of Segregation

Inclusive education is upheld by practitioners and educational researchers as the pinnacle of social justice being practiced in schooling environments. It is regarded as a development in educational theory and practice, and a move away from the restrictive and oppressive past-practice of segregated education, most especially for children labeled with disabilities. This commonly held assertion, however, has limited education professionals from considering the implications of the practice for which they advocate: despite being enveloped in a guise of a social-justice oriented solution to segregation of children labeled with disabilities, inclusion has become the new face of restriction, regulation, and marginalization in education (Graham & Slee, 2006).

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Clicklaw: Legal Information for the Public

Access to justice needs a culture shift. Among other things, we need to put the public first, encourage collaboration between knowledgeable people from different organizations and across all sectors, take measures to prevent disputes from unnecessary escalation, and make the justice system easier to understand1. Everyone deserves to know about their rights and responsibilities in their community. Clicklaw aims to do that for people in British Columbia.

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What haunts comedians? How stand up comedians inhabit the pedagogical space of comedy as a way to speak the unspoken about racism and colonial traces

The pedagogical space of comedy is one related to the informal, temporary, ephemeral, public encounter where we are being taught by the performance (Biesta, 2011). These pedagogies according to Trinidad-Galvan (2001) ‘highlight the mundane and the everyday as powerful sites for learning” (p. 605). Since comedians specialize in the everyday, mundane experiences of themselves and others, they provide powerful narrative elements connected and related to a colonial past and present that are rendered invisible otherwise.

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