Bilingual Corner 2016

Collaboration

Access Pro Bono Society of BC has partnered with the Canadian Chinese Consumers Association BC to explore a new way to involve non-legal experts and professionals to help with consumer protection matters.

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Gender and Its Effects on Social Justice in Education

In his master's thesis, the author proposed discussing gender discourses in the curriculum of teacher education in Chile, from a post-critical gender perspective. His attention on this specific field responded to the findings of research arguing that teachers play a fundamental role in gender socialization of students, contributing to the reproduction of inequalities in society (Gray & Leith, 2004; FLACSO, 2006).

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Positive and Negative Educational Suffering in International Models of Education

As many authors indicate (Jonas, 2010; Hillesheim, 1986; Cheng, 2011; Todd, 2001, 2002; and particularly Mintz, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2013; and Biesta, 2005) suffering is a natural and essential part of any educational process. The fact that a student needs to suffer in order to learn something new may seem counterintuitive and, in fact, traditional progressive education is against it: "It is a recurring theme in progressive educational thought that has given rise to the widely held belief that frustration, confusion, distress, and other painful moments in education inhibit learning" (Mintz, 2012, p. 249). As Avi Mintz states in the same piece, shielding students from the distress that might come from valuable educational challenges is actually unproductive. It is precisely in those frustrating and painful moments that any individual becomes a learner. Educational suffering is what Mintz (2012) calls "potentially valuable educational distress".

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Literature and Language Teaching

For the vast majority of education specialists, there is nothing obvious about the teaching of literature, as there is no general agreement on exactly what it entails (Séoud: 30). No doubt the ambiguous, subjective, and paradoxical nature of literature has led some to question its teaching, particularly those belonging to an academic tradition that places its primary focus on the examination of homogeneous objects of study. Following in the wake of literary studies, the didactics of literature went through three broad phases over the last century.

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Pedagogies of the everyday and the New Archive: Exploring practices, objects and language in the "War on Terror"

In this article, I explore how the events of 9/11 have influenced everyday practices, objects and language creating a new archive. The new archive refers to particular ways of memorializing 9/11 that are simultaneously global/universal and local/personal, drawing on the spectacularity of the event and the specific range of sense­making they permit. The new archive encapsulates 9/11 as an ahistorical depoliticized event, that is rendered linear via an emotive narrative relying on a cause-­effect relationship (Amoore, 2007; Simpson, 2006; Zehfuss, 2010). I argue that the simultaneous universalization/personalization of 9/11 is also made possible via the new archive which extends beyond the official memorization practices sanctioned, authorized and initiated by state agencies.

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Curriculum Beyond Credentials: Reclaiming the Subject

Over the last century, curriculum has been thought of as mainly a matter of determining the right subject-matter contents and arranging them in the right way for a course of study.  In what could be read as a regressive move, current educational policies and practices are increasingly placing a strong accent on competency-based curricula, in a return to pre-defined behaviours and standardized measurement as a norm to deal with educative practice in direct relation to economic matters. However, what the reconceptualist movement (Huebner 1997; Pinar 2015) and critical perspectives of education (Freire 1970; Tadeu Da Silva 2001) have helped us see, is that far from a technical, administrative, objective and value-free practice, what is actually at play in curriculum is the mediation of power relations which constitute knowledge and identities. In other words, in the context of institutionalized education, we learn much more than just contents and techniques. We learn ways of being and becoming.

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