Publications - Books

Books for educators based on research projects undertaken by the Centre for Education, Law and Society.
If you are interested in ordering any of the publications listed below, please email Chantal Faucher directly at cels@sfu.ca

Is Everyone Really Equal? An Introduction to Key Concepts in Social Justice Education 
Dr. Özlem Sensoy & Dr. Robin DiAngelo

2018 Society of Professors of Education Outstanding Book Award

This practical handbook will introduce readers to social justice, providing tools for developing “critical social justice literacy” and for taking action towards a more just society. Accessible to students from high school through graduate school, this book offers a collection of detailed and engaging explanations of key concepts in social justice education, including critical thinking, socialization, group identity, prejudice, discrimination, oppression, power, privilege, and White supremacy. Based on extensive experience in a range of settings in the United States and Canada, the authors address the most common stumbling blocks to understanding social justice. They provide recognizable examples, scenarios, and vignettes illustrating these concepts.


Order via Teachers College Press
Order via Amazon.ca
Order via Amazon.com

 

Rethinking Popular Culture and Media
 (2nd edition)
Dr. Özlem Sensoy

Description: Rethinking Popular Culture and Media is a provocative collection of articles drawn from Rethinking Schools magazine. It begins with the idea that the “popular” in classrooms and in the everyday lives of teachers and students is fundamentally political. This anthology includes outstanding articles by elementary and secondary public school teachers, scholars, and activists who examine how and what popular toys, books, films, music, and other media “teach.” These thoughtful essays offer strong conceptual critiques and practical pedagogical strategies for educators at every level to engage with the popular.

Co-Edited with Dr. Elizabeth Marshall

Available to order via Rethinking Schools

Click Here to Read More.

 

Muslim Voices in School: Narratives of Identity and Pluralism 

Dr. Özlem Sensoy

Description: This book is a collection of readable, accessible, compelling, varied, voiced, passionate, real, textured, multi-faceted, hybrid, fearless, fearful, cautious, bold, modest, and inspired accounts of living Islam in relation to mainstream schooling in the West. The book helps to make the diverse experiences of Muslim students (from elementary through university, student through professor) both contextual and complex. The politics and education about Islam, Muslims, Arabs, Turks, Iranians and all that is associated with the West’s popular imagination of the monolithic “Middle-East” has long been framed within problematics. The goal of this book is to push back against the reductive mainstream narratives told about Muslim and Middle Eastern heritage students for generations if not centuries, in mainstream schools. The chapters are each authored by Muslim-acculturated scholars. This book will be of interest to teachers, administrators, students and scholars. As well, the content is suited to fields of study including ethnic studies, critical multicultural education, anti-oppression approaches to education, curriculum studies, social issues in education, social contexts of education, and qualitative research in education.

on Amazon.ca
on Amazon.com
via the publisher Sense
Click Here to Read More.

 

Once Upon a Crime
Cassidy, Wanda, and Yates, Ruth (2005). Once upon a crime: Using stories, simulations, and mock trials to explore justice and citizenship in elementary school, Calgary: Detselig Enterprises Ltd.

Description: This book identifies incidents in familiar stories where someone's rights have been interfered with, and then asks children to solve the problems that the hurtful behavior has caused.  Did Goldilocks willfully trespass and destroy the property of the three bears? What crime did the wolf commit against the three little pigs? Is the wolf obligated to repair the homes? Was Peter Pan guilty of kidnapping? To find solutions to these, and other questions, students experience what it is like to investigate a crime scene, uncover important facts, weave these together into an argument supported with evidence and witnesses, and present their findings in a trial that simulates a court hearing. They also learn about other ways of resolving conflict, through mediation, negotiation and restorative justice processes. By participating in these activities, children learn about the role law plays in their lives and their rights and responsibilities as citizens. Students engage in critical thinking, hone literacy skills, and gain practice in resolving conflict.

This book offers step-by-step instructions for conducting mock trials based on fairy tales and other multicultural stories. Five complete trial scripts are included for classroom use. Also included are ideas for adapting contemporary stories into civil and criminal trials, mediation and negotiation activities.

Click Here to Read More.

Sample pdf of Chapters 1-3 plus the exciting case of Her Majesty the Queen v. Goldilocks (Goldilocks and the Three Bears Mock Trial)

Available to order from Indigo.

Available to order from Amazon.ca

Available to order from Amazon.com

 

Let's Talk About Law in Elementary School
Cassidy, Wanda, and Yates, Ruth (eds.) (1998). Let's talk about law in elementary school. Calgary: Detselig Enterprises Ltd.

Description: This book helps teachers integrate legal concepts in a variety of elementary school subject areas. It addresses teachers' need for relevant ideas and materials that can be integrated into the core subjects of social studies, language arts or science. It also provides information on where to obtain other useful materials for classroom use, as well as law resources to assist them in developing their own classroom materials.

The opening chapter discusses why and how law should be taught to elementary-aged children. Chapter 2 traces the development of law-related education in the United States and discusses current trends. In Chapter 3 the authors show how knowing and practicing the skills and processes of law can help children avoid or resolve conflicts. Chapter 4 addresses the powerful effect of the informal curriculum and the need for educators to establish classrooms which model legal and democratic principles. The final six chapters outline different ways for incorporating law education into various subject areas: addressing legal issues through story drama; using literature to learn law-related concepts; experiencing the processes of law through games and simulations; using law-related issues to address critical thinking in social studies; and exploring the law through forensics in science classes.  

Click Here to Read More.

Sample pdf of Chapter 1 (Why Teach Law in the Elementary Classroom?) and Chapter 4 (Establishing a Democratic Classroom)

Available to order from Amazon.ca

Available to order from Amazon.com