Faculty and Staff

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS

Battershill, Claire
BA Hons (Oxford), PhD (Toronto)
cbatters@sfu.ca

Dr. Claire Battershill joins the Department of English as a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow. Her project, “Travelling Books: A Transnational History of Literary Publishers and their Archives, 1914-2014,” uses material from publishers’ archives to examine the relationship between literary aesthetics and the emergence of a global publishing trade. She is a co-investigator on the Modernist Archives Publishing Project (MAPP), a digital resource for the study of modernist book production focusing first on Leonard and Virginia Woolf's Hogarth Press. Dr. Battershill has published articles on a variety of topics in twentieth and twenty-first century literary culture and book history. She is also a fiction writer and her first book of short stories, Circus, was published by McClelland & Stewart in 2014. www.clairebattershill.com

Lee, Katja
BA Hons (SFU), MA (UBC), PhD (McMaster)
katja_lee@sfu.ca

Dr. Katja Lee has joined the Department of English as a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow. Her project, “Canadian Magazines and the Development of Contemporary Celebrity Culture in Canada,” traces the emergence of a modern and vibrant celebrity culture in Canada in the 1910-1930 period. Using a range of English-Canadian magazines, she will be charting the rise of celebrity profiling in Canada, the patterns of representation that emerge from this period, and the ideological work this journalism was striving to do. Dr. Lee has published extensively on celebrity and life writing and is co-editor of Celebrity Cultures in Canada (forthcoming WLUP) and Contemporary Publics (forthcoming Palgrave).

Poll, Melissa
BFA Acting (UBC), MA (UBC), PhD (Royal Holloway, University of London)
melissa_poll@sfu.ca

Dr. Melissa Poll joins the Department of English as a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow. Her project, “Towards Reconciliation: Recognizing the Intergenerational Repercussions of Residential Schools through Intercultural Performance-Making,” investigates how select performing arts companies are crafting intercultural performances via a dramaturgy of reconciliation that restages colonizing practices in an effort to acknowledge the legacy of colonialism for First Peoples. Dr. Poll’s research on performance-making and interculturalism has been published in Body, Space & Technology JournalCanadian Theatre Review, Theatre Research in Canada, and Interventions and her monograph, Robert Lepage’s Scenographic Dramaturgy, is forthcoming (Palgrave Macmillan). She has also worked as an actor (Arts Club, Bard on the Beach, and Théâtre la Seizième), critic (Vancouver Sun, Vancouver Plays, and The British Theatre Guide) and dramaturg (Solo Collective and Shameless Hussy).