WRITING AND RHETORIC

Writing and Rhetoric Certificate

Students in this certificate will investigate the theories and methods of rhetorical analysis and production through a course sequence that reflects the interdisciplinary vitality of the field, drawing together studies of rhetoric in English, philosophy, linguistics, and communications.

Students may also choose to take the Writing and Rhetoric courses as part of the English major or minor or as elective courses while pursuing a different major/minor, as long as they meet the prerequisites.

Certificate Admission and Program Requirements

Writing and Rhetoric Courses

ENGL 199W-3
Introduction to University Writing

An introduction to reading and writing in the academic disciplines. Prerequisite: 12 units. Students with credit for ENGL 199 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

ENGL 371-4
Writing: Theory and Practice

Students will engage in theoretically informed practice of writing in various non-academic genres. Emphasis will be placed on the kinds of writing that students are likely to use after graduation. Prerequisite: Two 100 division English courses and two 200 division English courses. Recommended: One of English 199/199W or 214. This course may be repeated for credit if a different topic is taught, though students who obtained credit for English 371 prior to Summer 2015 may not take this couse for further credit.  

ENGL 470W-4
Studies in the English Language

Focussed studies within linguistic, pragmatic, historical and social theories of the English language. Prerequisite: 45 units including at least one upper-division English course, or permission of instructor. Reserved for English honors, major, joint major and minor students. The course may be repeated for credit if a different topic is taught, though students who obtained credit for English 470W prior to Summer 2015 may not take this course for further credit. Students with credit for ENGL 470 may not take this course for further credit. Writing. 

ENGL 214-3
History and Principles of Rhetoric

Introduction to the history and principles of rhetoric, and their application to the creation and analysis of written, visual, and other forms of persuasion. Prerequisite: Two 100 division English courses.

ENGL 375-4
Studies in Rhetoric

Advanced study in the theory and/or history of rhetoric. Prerequisite: Two 100 division English courses, and two 200 division English courses. Recommended: One of English 199/199W or 214. The course may be repeated for credit if a different topic is taught, though students who obtained credit for English 375 prior to Summer 2015 may not take this course for further credit. 

ENGL 475W-4
Topics in Rhetoric

Seminar in a particular topic, approach, or author in the field of rhetoric and writing. The course may be repeated for credit if a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units. Strongly recommended: ENGL 214 or 375. Reserved for English honors, major, joint major and minor students. Students with credit for ENGL 475 may not take this course for further credit. Students who obtained credit for ENGL 475W prior to Summer 2015 may not take this course for further credit. Writing. 

Faculty

Peter Cramer

Peter Cramer is an associate professor in the Department of English at Simon Fraser University. He teaches courses in writing, discourse analysis, argumentation, and the history and theory of rhetoric. His research examines how writers and speakers shape controversy and consensus in discourse. He has analyzed cases in a number of public and professional domains, and published his work in Written Communication, Argumentation, Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Rhetoric Review, and Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. His monograph Controversy as News Discourse was published by Springer in 2011. 

Sean Zwagerman

Dr. Zwagerman is interested broadly in rhetoric and writing, in the compositional relationship among the word, the self, and the world. His particular interests include the intersections of rhetorical theory and speech-act theory, the rhetoric of humour, and public outrage about plagiarism and student literacy. Forthcoming work includes contributions to a collection of essays on the rhetoric of oil and to a collection on transgressive women’s humour, as well as a book-length project using speech-act theory to define the limits of rhetoric and clarify criteria of success and failure.