FHS Seminar Series - Molecular determinants of HIV-1 escape from antiviral T cells

by Dr. Mark Brockman, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair (Tier 2), Faculty of Health Sciences and Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, SFU

March 01, 2018

Event Type

Seminar Series

Date

March 01, 2018 at 12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

Location

Blusson Hall, Room 9920

Abstract 

The HIV sequence adapts to individuals and populations through rapid development and selection of mutations, thus enhancing viral persistence and pathogenesis. A major driver of viral adaptation is the host immune system, in particular HIV’s need to evade CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Differences in host genetics and unique features of antiviral CTL responses among HIV-infected individuals place divergent pressures on the virus, some of which have been associated with control of plasma viremia and non-progression to AIDS in the absence of therapy. This presentation will introduce the complex host and viral factors that contribute to HIV’s ability to evade CTL through selection of “escape” mutants. Focusing on a single viral epitope, Gag TL9 (TPQDLNTML), results will illustrate the impact of HIV fitness constraints, host genetics, and T cell diversity on viral adaptation pathways. The implications of this work for HIV vaccines and novel therapeutics will be discussed.

Biography

Dr. Mark Brockman, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair (Tier 2), holds joint positions in the Faculty of Health Sciences and Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at Simon Fraser University. His research employs molecular and cell biology methods to investigate host-virus interactions that contribute to HIV pathogenesis. Current studies examine the impact of natural sequence variation on HIV protein function and the role of T cell receptor diversity during viral control. Dr. Brockman collaborates extensively with African investigators to conduct population-level analyses of the global HIV epidemic that may assist development of a vaccine or cure.

 

* This Seminar Series is open to the SFU Research Community.  

* This seminar will be available by webast and will be recorded . For webcast view here.

*  A light lunch will be available at this seminar.  

* The FHS Research Seminar Series is an Accredited Small Group Learning by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons.