Critical Nationalisms & Counterpublics

March 01, 2019

March 1–2, Room 7000, SFU Harbour Centre 

With support from SSHRC Canada Council, the University of British Columbia’s Department of English Language and Literatures, the A/C/T Network housed in the Social Justice Institute, St. John’s College, The Insurgent Architects’ House for Creative Writing, the David Lam Chair, UBC’s Faculty of Graduate Studies and SFU’s Institute for the Humanities. Green College has supported the conference through their accompanying series “Critical Nationalisms, Counterpublics.”

Critical Nationalisms & Counterpublics

Organized by Dina Al-Kassim, Karyn Ball, Larissa Lai, and Madeleine Reddon this conference brings together scholars from across the humanities disciplines to theorize our present political conditions. Recent years have seen a resurgence of populism, nationalism, and discourses of racial supremacy in traditionally liberal Western democracies, notably in the USA, Canada, and the UK. While political coalitions and solidarity movements have mounted widespread resistant responses to these social/political developments, we believe that illiberal trends in contemporary politics also call for concerted rethinking of the grounds of politics and the public sphere, with particular attention to the connections between structures of sexual, racial and political power.  This conference addresses the necessity and status of the “nation” as a category of belonging, the perils of the new nationalisms, and the promise of the counterpublics that have arisen in response to rightward turns in political governance. 

Keynotes 

Andrew Parker
David Palumbo-Liu

Speakers 

Rei Terada
Tarek El-Ariss 
Karyn Ball 
Becki Ross 
Trish Salah 
JP Catungal
Jaleh Mansoor 
Rita Wong
John Culbert 
Nasser Mufti 
Sheila Giffen 
Deena Dinat
Madeleine Reddon 
Deanna Reder 
Jordan Abel 
Lillian Allen
Sandra Tomcs 
Nadine Naber 
Stephen Collis
Larissa Lai

Click HERE for the Schedule

Contact

Maddie Reddon

Organized by Dina Al-Kassim, Karyn Ball, Larissa Lai, and Madeleine Reddon, this conference brings together scholars from across the humanities disciplines to theorize our present political conditions. Recent years have seen a resurgence of populism, nationalism, and discourses of racial supremacy in traditionally liberal Western democracies, notably in the USA, Canada, and the UK. While political coalitions and solidarity movements have mounted widespread resistant responses to these social/political developments, we believe that illiberal trends in contemporary politics also call for concerted rethinking of the grounds of politics and the public sphere, with particular attention to the connections between structures of sexual, racial and political power.  This conference addresses the necessity and status of the “nation” as a category of belonging, the perils of the new nationalisms, and the promise of the counterpublics that have arisen in response to rightward turns in political governance
Organized by Dina Al-Kassim, Karyn Ball, Larissa Lai, and Madeleine Reddon, this conference brings together scholars from across the humanities disciplines to theorize our present political conditions. Recent years have seen a resurgence of populism, nationalism, and discourses of racial supremacy in traditionally liberal Western democracies, notably in the USA, Canada, and the UK. While political coalitions and solidarity movements have mounted widespread resistant responses to these social/political developments, we believe that illiberal trends in contemporary politics also call for concerted rethinking of the grounds of politics and the public sphere, with particular attention to the connections between structures of sexual, racial and political power.  This conference addresses the necessity and status of the “nation” as a category of belonging, the perils of the new nationalisms, and the promise of the counterpublics that have arisen in response to rightward turns in political governance
Organized by Dina Al-Kassim, Karyn Ball, Larissa Lai, and Madeleine Reddon, this conference brings together scholars from across the humanities disciplines to theorize our present political conditions. Recent years have seen a resurgence of populism, nationalism, and discourses of racial supremacy in traditionally liberal Western democracies, notably in the USA, Canada, and the UK. While political coalitions and solidarity movements have mounted widespread resistant responses to these social/political developments, we believe that illiberal trends in contemporary politics also call for concerted rethinking of the grounds of politics and the public sphere, with particular attention to the connections between structures of sexual, racial and political power.  This conference addresses the necessity and status of the “nation” as a category of belonging, the perils of the new nationalisms, and the promise of the counterpublics that have arisen in response to rightward turns in political governance
Organized by Dina Al-Kassim, Karyn Ball, Larissa Lai, and Madeleine Reddon, this conference brings together scholars from across the humanities disciplines to theorize our present political conditions. Recent years have seen a resurgence of populism, nationalism, and discourses of racial supremacy in traditionally liberal Western democracies, notably in the USA, Canada, and the UK. While political coalitions and solidarity movements have mounted widespread resistant responses to these social/political developments, we believe that illiberal trends in contemporary politics also call for concerted rethinking of the grounds of politics and the public sphere, with particular attention to the connections between structures of sexual, racial and political power.  This conference addresses the necessity and status of the “nation” as a category of belonging, the perils of the new nationalisms, and the promise of the counterpublics that have arisen in response to rightward turns in political governance