Skip to Content

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND INDIGENEITY: INTERNATIONAL POLICY MAKING BETWEEN NEOLIBERALISM AND HUMAN RIGHTS

Date: 
Thursday, September 23, 2010

Finding ways of ‘protecting’ the knowledge and heritage of indigenous peoples has become a significant issue in international law and policy-making, engaging numerous United Nations bodies (the Biodiversity Convention, WIPO, UNCTAD, UNESCO, WTO as well as the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Peoples), NGOs and indigenous activists. Should indigenous peoples seek intellectual property protection? What are the alternatives? The York Centre for Public Policy and Law hosts a panel presentation by three scholars, Catherine Bell (Law, University of Alberta), Patricia Goff (Political Science, Laurier University) and Rosemary Coombe (CRC in Law, Communication & Culture, York University) who will critically consider the motives, interests, agencies and politics that drive this field of international activity and explain the research work of three networks of scholars who explore this field and collaborate with indigenous peoples.

Where: York University, Toronto, 626 York Research Tower

When: September 23, 2010, 12:00pm - 2:30pm



Dr. Radut | ip_event