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2014

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Aug 27 2014 - 09:37

By Alexa Walker

As genetic research is increasingly applied to new areas of study, including in archaeological and heritage contexts, a range of questions arise concerning the social, ethical, legal, and political implications of ancient DNA (aDNA). This essay provides an introduction to the field of aDNA, examines emerging ethical and practical challenges in its application, and explores why information from ancient DNA research is important and relevant to people today.

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Aug 7 2014 - 14:39

By Carol J. Ellick

Imagine for a moment that you are a creative, quiet, inquisitive 9-year-old student in a fourth-grade classroom in Oklahoma. The teacher, very excitedly, has just announced that it is time to celebrate the Land Run, a day on which the school reenacts the opening of the Oklahoma Territory to white settlers in 1889!

Nuxalk sun mask logo of Nuxalk.Nation.org
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jun 19 2014 - 15:43

By Jennifer Kramer

On January 26, 2014, the Seattle Art Museum (SAM) and the Denver Art Museum (DAM) announced a friendly wager on the outcome of Super Bowl 2014 between the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos.

Florida State University mascots, Chief Osceola and Renegade
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, May 28 2014 - 10:50

By Brian Egan

Debate about the use of Native American imagery or symbols and the representation of Native peoples in sport has been with us for decades.

New Zealand Flag
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Apr 29 2014 - 16:37

By Maddy Fowler

Between Waitangi Day on February 6th, commemorating the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, and Anzac Day on April 25th, remembering the first major military action fought by the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps during the First World War in 1915, there is a great sense of patriotism in New Zealand, which is often expressed through the display of the national flag.

Stern in the field (on the right), ca. 1970s
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Apr 29 2014 - 10:44

By Jennifer R. O’Neal

In the fall of 2012, I began my tenure as the University Historian and Archivist at the University of Oregon Special Collections and University Archives. 

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Mar 25 2014 - 11:55

By Ruth-Rebeccalynne Tyana Lokelani Aloua

Aloha mai kakou, my name is Ruth-Rebeccalynne Tyana Lokelani Aloua. I am a kanaka ‘oiwi (Native Hawaiian) born in Wailuku, Maui, and raised in Kailua-Kona, a town located on Hawai‘i Island. 

Walk for Reconciliation, September 22, 2013, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Mar 25 2014 - 09:44

By Robin R. R. Gray

In Canada, the call for reconciliation with Indigenous peoples has received increasing public attention since 2007, when the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement was reached. 

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Mar 13 2014 - 16:01

...An open letter to those Canadians who are Irish, and those who wish they were.

By Sinéad Liobhas (Jennifer Lewis)

This is a cheeky look at the appropriation of Irish culture in Canada. Though I’m no Jonathan Swift, I wanted to use some typically Dublin humour, in honour of everyone’s favourite holiday, St. Patrick’s Day.

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Feb 28 2014 - 11:06

By George Nicholas

Since its inception, our “Appropriation (?) of the Month” column has explored what and when something might be considered a misappropriation, a cultural borrowing, or something else. The answer isn’t always clear or simple, and is often nuanced or contextual.

Etruscan Tomb (Credit: Archaeology Magazine)
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jan 31 2014 - 11:48

By Gordon Lobay

A remarkable tomb was discovered in Tuscany in September 2013, containing two sets of skeletal remains laying on two platforms. Included with the remains were pottery, numerous metallic and terracotta objects, and other artifacts. 

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jan 7 2014 - 12:33

By Julie Mitchell

The traditional practice of sand drawing in Vanuatu is both a direct means of transferring cultural heritage information and a medium of communication that continues to function as a form of cultural exchange today. 

2013

Aida Abdykanova and Caroline Beebe, overlooking Bishkek.
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Dec 3 2013 - 11:40

By K. Anne Pyburn

The IPinCH-funded “Grassroots Resource Preservation and Management in Kyrgyzstan” project is intended to begin a public conversation among both urban and rural people about intellectual property and cultural heritage in Kyrgyzstan, a post-Soviet nation where ties to the past have been attenuated and even severed. 

Cover: Two young Inuit, Aipili Sakiagak (front) and his brother Putulik (back),
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Dec 3 2013 - 11:26

By Émilie Ruffin

Since 2011 I have worked with the Avataq Cultural Institute and have been a member of the IPinCH-supported case study “Cultural Tourism in Nunavik,” collaborating closely with project leader Daniel Gendron. 

Susan at the Stolo People of the River Conference, held at the SRRMC, June 2012
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Dec 3 2013 - 11:13

By Hannah Turner 

As a curator and professor at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, Susan Rowley’s goals lie with the interests of the community members she works with, and she seeks to understand their needs and facilitate their research interests. 

Catherine Bell leads a discussion at an IPinCH-sponsored event in the Yukon, Can
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Dec 3 2013 - 11:10

By Nicole Aylwin

It’s been just over a year since I joined IPinCH Steering Committee member Catherine Bell in the Yukon to assist with the IPinCH-supported Yukon First Nations Heritage Values and Heritage Resource Management community-based initiative.  

Artefacts used in the Custodians and Curators Workshop to highlight the range of
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Nov 25 2013 - 11:21

By Ian McIntosh

The curious discovery of 1,000-year-old African coins during World War II on the north Australian coast provides a unique opportunity to rewrite Australian history with a focus on indigenous perspectives.

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Nov 20 2013 - 01:00

By Gloria Bell

Attending In the Balance: Indigeneity, Performance, Globalization held at Royal Holloway, University of London, from Oct 24-27, was a great opportunity to learn, reflect and challenge my current thinking about indigenous arts and culture in Canada and internationally.

Andy Everson’s "Sons of Baxwbakwalanuksiwe’"
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Nov 12 2013 - 11:33

By Adam Solomonian 

K’omoks/Kwakwaka’wakw artist Andy Everson recently produced a limited edition print titled Sons of Baxwbakwalanuksiwe’ (Oct 2013). 

Inuvialuit Parka from the Smithsonian Collection
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Oct 29 2013 - 10:45

By Irine Prastio

In July of 2013, I participated in the Summer Institute of Museum Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History, in Washington, DC. My plan was to document and establish a visual database of clothing artifacts in the Inuvialuit’s MacFarlane Collection, as a part of my masters thesis project.  

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Oct 28 2013 - 15:07

By Emily Benson

The appropriation and commodification of Indigenous artifacts has a long history in British Columbia. 

Gift in Solidary Totem Pole unveiling ceremony on September 19, 2013 on the Tsle
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Oct 18 2013 - 12:25

By Mique'l Icesis Dangeli 

“Warrior up!” This was the call to action declared by Ta’ah (Amy George), a highly respected Grandmother of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, when she learned of Kinder-Morgan’s proposal to build pipelines carrying oil from the Tar Sands in Alberta through her people’s traditional and unceded territory. 

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Sep 26 2013 - 09:58

By Brian Egan

Earlier this year I wrote about Air Pacific Ltd.’s intention to reinvigorate its business through a rebranding strategy, part of which relied on the use of elements of Fijian cultural heritage, and the controversy that this generated (click here to read the earlier piece). In this article, I present a brief update on the issue.

Johnny Depp as Tonto
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jul 17 2013 - 13:41

By Nicole Aylwin

This past weekend The Lone Ranger premiered in theatres across North America. Starring Johnny Depp as Tonto, the Disney film had been widely anticipated, but not always for the right reasons. 

Claire Poirier
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jul 9 2013 - 11:10

By Claire Poirier

What are the implications of using the tools of the dominant knowledge paradigm to protect Indigenous knowledge? 

Western Inuit teacup, unknown artist, woven from seagrass. Museum of Vancouver c
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jun 18 2013 - 13:42

By Maddie Knickerbocker and Lisa Truong

Homi Bhabha’s explanation of colonial mimicry forms part of what is arguably one of his most well-known essays, "Of Mimicry and Man: The Ambivalence of Colonial Discourse."

Moriori descendant, Nicole Whaitiri with a rakau momori (living tree carving) on
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jun 12 2013 - 10:29

The Hokotehi Moriori Trust (HMT) is a partner in the IPinCH Moriori Cultural Database project, which focuses on the recording of Moriori cultural heritage. 

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, May 21 2013 - 10:51

By Hannah Turner

On January 29th , 2013, a group of friends celebrated a birthday party at a local bar in Toronto, Ontario. As several major publications later reported (including the National Post), the group of about 15-30 people dressed up as “Cowboys and Indians,” complete with full headdresses and war paint. 

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Apr 18 2013 - 09:36

By Robin R. R. Gray

I am Tsimshian from Lax Kw’alaams, Ginaxangiik Tribe, House of ‘Liyaa’mlaxha, Gispwudwada Clan. I am writing this blog piece to discuss the appropriation of totem poles from a Northwest Coast First Nation perspective. 

King Richard III
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Mar 18 2013 - 13:08

By Alexa Walker

On February 4, 2013, the University of Leicester announced that the bones of King Richard III (1452-1485) had been unearthed from beneath a parking lot in Leicester, England. 

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Feb 18 2013 - 17:49

By Brian Egan

On May 14, 2012, Air Pacific Ltd. announced a number of initiatives designed to improve the air carrier’s business outlook. After several years of financial losses, the company, which bills itself as “Fiji’s International Airline,” made public the key elements of its turnaround strategy. 

claire poirier - tipi
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Feb 5 2013 - 10:47

By Claire Poirier

At a well-known archaeological site in Alberta, a diverse group of individuals gather together on a large tarp to participate in a ceremonial feast. A Plains Cree woman, having discovered that the ancestral spirits at this site were hungry, had invited a ceremonialist from her community to carry out the feast. 

Traditional Samoan tattooing
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jan 25 2013 - 17:13

By George Nicholas

Tattoos have become remarkably popular in recent decades. Once associated mainly with sailors and military personnel (as well as convicts, bikers, and other “marginal” groups) in Western society, today they are virtually commonplace. 

Jessica Lai, Cathy Bell and Sheila Greer
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jan 11 2013 - 01:00

By Jessica C. Lai

For the last three years, I have worked at the University of Lucerne, Switzerland, for a project called the International Trade of Indigenous Cultural Heritage, funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. I came to know Catherine Bell through a workshop that we hosted in Lucerne, in January 2010.

Lena Mortensen
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jan 1 2013 - 01:00

By Kristen Dobbin

Lena Mortensen, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto, advocates that her students consider the cultural, economic and ethical implications of tourism development, and to think about tourism as a kind of cultural practice in and of itself, one that is shaped by expectations about difference that come from long histories of representing places and peoples.

2012

Screenshot from Official “Hometown of Santa” website, Dec 2012.
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Dec 13 2012 - 12:06

By Kristen Dobbin

Rovaniemi, a city of nearly 61,000 that straddles the Arctic Circle in northern Finland, markets itself as “the Official Hometown of Santa Claus.”  Here visitors can meet Santa and his elves, take a reindeer sleigh ride through the snowy landscape, and buy local products.

No Doubt and 'Looking Hot'
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Nov 23 2012 - 16:57

By George Nicholas

Recent controversy over a music video released by the band No Doubt has raised questions not only about the appropriation of Native American heritage, but also about the often-unintended nature of appropriation. The video of No Doubt’s song ‘Looking Hot’ features band members dressed as … well, cowboys and Indians. 

Posted by Brian Egan, Oct 12 2012 - 16:11

By George Nicholas

Commercial advertising is rife with allusions not only to familiar aspects of popular culture, but also the incorporation of more exotic images, ideas, and places associated with other societies, past and present. 

Mata Ortiz Pot
Posted by George Nicholas, Sep 7 2012 - 08:59

By George Nicholas

Although the inappropriate use of another’s culture may be profoundly harmful, not all cultural borrowings constitute appropriation in this negative sense. 

False Face Masks
Posted by George Nicholas, Jul 6 2012 - 10:04

By George Nicholas

An unusual sighting in Washington state, a house address sign in the form of an Iroquoian False Face mask (address has been removed). Among the Iroquois of the northeastern North America, masks were an important element of rituals. 

Appropriation in Alcohol Labels?
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, May 15 2012 - 00:00

By George Nicholas

The use of Indigenous images, icons, and peoples in marketing alcoholic beverages is not new, and can be seen in products such as Crazy Horse Malt Liquor, Baby Blue Whiskey (made from Hopi Blue Corn), and even an "Otzi the Ice Man" beer. 

Rosemary Coombe
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Apr 1 2012 - 00:00

As a legal anthropologist, Rosemary Coombe has taught on intellectual property (IP) issues at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law for 12 years and has published widely on the ways IP shapes cultural life. 

2011

Posted by Sarah Carr-Locke, Jun 6 2011 - 11:42

By Sarah Carr-Locke

Since last September, I have been a Research Assistant for the Digital Information Systems and Cultural Heritage working group for the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage (IPinCH) project. 

Posted by Sarah Carr-Locke, May 17 2011 - 12:34

By Sarah Carr-Locke

As part of my research assistant work for IPinCH, I have the privilege of helping expand the IPinCH community through the use of social networking.  I am excited about this work for several reasons, which I thought I would share.

Posted by Solen Roth, Apr 26 2011 - 16:06

By Solen Roth

Some thoughts brought to you by: the IPinCH Graduate Student dinner, Digital Natives and The Land We Are

The IPinCH Team at Lake Akan
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Mar 20 2011 - 00:00

By George NicholasJoe Watkins, and Sheila Greer

In January 2011, members of the IPinCH Project travelled to Lake Akan in Hokkaido, northern Japan, to participate in a symposium on intellectual property with our Ainu and Japanese colleagues. 

Posted by Solen Roth, Jan 10 2011 - 13:58

By Solen Roth

Last October, Professor Dame Marilyn Strathern was the Hawthorn Lecturer for the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. 

2010

George Nicholas
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jun 12 2010 - 13:06

One thing you should know about George Nicholas is he can be stubborn about things he believes in. During the final interview with the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) adjudication committee reviewing the IPinCH project proposal, a committee member asked, “What makes you qualified to direct a project of this scope?” 

Posted by Solen Roth, Jun 10 2010 - 09:34

By Solen Roth, PhD Candidate, The University of British Columbia.

Just back from a four day seminar at the Otsego Institute at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown (NY)! A small group of junior professionals and graduate students in art history and anthropology from Canada and the US were invited to present on their current work and discuss some of the key issues in their field with peers and faculty.

2009

Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Nov 1 2009 - 00:00

As an ethnomusicologist, jazz pianist, and nationally acclaimed anthropologist, Michael Asch is in a unique position to help find harmony in the relationships between First Nations and Canada.

Sonya Atalay
Posted by Kristen Dobbin, Jun 1 2009 - 00:00

Sonya Atalay is an archaeologist doing fieldwork in the Great Lakes region of the United States and in Turkey. 

2008

Replicas for sale, at the Giza Pyramid Complex
Posted by George Nicholas, Nov 13 2008 - 22:06

By George Nicholas

Egypt, of course, has been the focus of antiquarian interest for millennia, as revealed by the ancient Greek traveler and historian Herodotis. But it also played a central role in the development of what would become the discipline of archaeology, as Giovanni Belzoni and others explored the land and collected antiquities on behalf of Great Britain, France, and other countries with colonial interests there.



Dr. Radut