Awards

To encourage students to declare a Minor in Labour Studies, or to pursue a Certificate, or to carry out some labour related research, or simply to take courses in Labour Studies, we are offering a set of awards and scholarships and research grants.

Contact the Director or the student advisor if you have questions about the awards.

You are welcome to apply for more than one award. Please only submit the documents requested in the award descriptions, and not any additional unrequested materials.

The James Clark Undergraduate Award
$2500 (1 award per year)

The James Clark Undergraduate Award in Labour Studies Endowment was established at Simon Fraser University in 2016 with a generous gift from Glen Clark, in honour of his father James, and with matching funds from the International Union of Painters & Allied Trades District Council 38.  Stay tuned for more information.

Dr Hari Sharma Foundation
$1000 (5 awards per year)

The Dr. Hari Sharma Foundation Annual Awards for the Labour Studies Program at Simon Fraser University were established in 2012 by a generous gift and commitment from the Dr. Hari Sharma Foundation.

Dr. Hari Sharma

Dr. Hari Sharma received his Ph.D. from Cornell.  He taught at the University of Delhi and the University of California at Los Angeles before coming to Simon Fraser University in 1968.  His areas of research interests included sociological theory, Marxism, peasantry, revolutionary movements in the Third World, the labour process, social change in post-revolutionary societies, nation-building, and South Asia.  Dr. Sharma passed away on March 16, 2010 surrounded by his comrades from the Vancouver Chapter of the Indian People’s Association in North America (IPANA).  Dr. Sharma, who co-founded the IPANA in 1976, left a legacy of activism in the service of the oppressed.  He remains an inspiration for engagement in the struggle for a better world, one without exploitation or religious, caste, ethnic or gender oppression.

Award Distribution

The Dr. Hari Sharma Foundation Awards in Labour Studies will be for $1,000 each.  Five awards will be awarded each year in any term. 

These awards are intended to provide assistance to deserving undergraduate students with demonstrated community service who are pursuing a Minor or Certificate in Labour Studies.

The awards will be granted annually in any term to SFU undergraduate students on the basis of the following criteria:

  • enrolled full-time in any faculty;
  • in good academic standing (minimum 2.00 CGPA);
  • completion of at least one Labour Studies course; and
  • demonstrated volunteerism/community service

Eligible students may apply for this award through the Director, Labour Studies Program.  As part of the application package, students must include the following supporting documentation:

  • a résumé summarizing scholastic achievements and work relevant to the aims of this award; 
  • a letter of reference verifying relevant community service/volunteer work; an
  • copies of all post-secondary transcripts.

Preference may be given to those pursuing an approved Minor or Certificate in Labour Studies.

The awards will be granted by the Senate Undergraduate Awards Adjudication Committee upon the nomination of the Director, Labour Studies Program.

Essay Prize: Ottawa Historical Society
$1,000 per year for student essay

The On-to-Ottawa Historical Society was founded in 1988 to preserve the memory of the historic 1935 On-to-Ottawa trek.  Over 1,000 young unemployed men left Vancouver in June that year to take their plea for work and wages to the federal government.  They rode atop CPR boxcars, exposed to the elements, and grew to almost 3,000 by the time they reached Regina.  Growing nervous, the federal government had the RCMP stop all eastbound trains, allowing only a small delegation of trekkers led by Arthur "Slim" Evans to continue to Ottawa, "on the cushions" for a meeting with Prime Minister R. B. Bennett.  The talks went badly, and the delegation returned to Regina. At a public meeting on ‘Dominion Day,’ July 1, the police attacked the assembled men, resulting in many injuries and the death of one policeman and one trekker.  Although the trek was stopped, it did have its effects: Bennett’s Conservative Party lost the election that year, the so-called ‘relief camps’ for the unemployed were soon dismantled, and the demands of the workers became influential in the development of social programs that followed in the postwar years.

The OTO society maintains a website at www.ontoottawa.ca, produced a video about the trek in 1992, provides speakers and information for events and research activities, and placed a bronze plaque commemorating the event on the overpass connecting Main Street to CRAB Park in Vancouver in 2010 to mark the 75th anniversary of this important moment in Canadian labour history.

To celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the On To Ottawa Trek in 1935, the On to Ottawa Historical Society is offering an essay prize of $1000.00

The prize will be awarded to a student historian (graduate or undergraduate) who produces the best research paper on some unexplored aspect of the On to Ottawa Trek, or a related subject relating to the 1930's in Canada such as the Mac-Paps, relief camps, organizations of the unemployed, an important strike, etc. (Please write for approval of topic.)

The prize is open to any student at a Canadian university; the paper should be about 5,000 words, submitted electronically by the last day of classes in a given semester.   A committee in the Labour Studies Program will assess the submitted papers, and the winner will be announced within the next month.  The winning paper will be posted to the OTO and LBST (SFU) web sites and be submitted by the Society to a historical journal for possible publication. All submissions and inquiries should be made to the Labour Studies Program, Simon Fraser University (attention: Dr. Gary Teeple, teeple@sfu.ca).

The OTO Historical Society will be recognized as the sponsor on all written and electronic copies of the paper and would have worldwide distribution rights.

CUPE Local 3338 Bursary in Labour Studies
$500

Program details from: The SFU Awards, Bursaries and Scholarships Database Search Application.

Type Bursaries
Award Name CUPE LOCAL 3338 Bursary In Labour Studies
Program Id UPBO703
Awarded Fall Spring Summer
Procedure Student Application
Terms of Reference Bursaries are offered based on demonstrated financial need and satisfactory academic performance to students who are approved in the labor studies certificate or minor program at Simon Fraser University.
Value 500

The Morgan Centre for Labour Research
$1,000 (5 awards per year)

Overview

The Morgan Centre for Labour Studies Annual Research Award (“the Award”) was established through a 2012 by a bequest from Richard ‘Lefty’ and Margaret Morgan.  The Award is for an undergraduate or graduate Simon Fraser University student, in good academic standing in any faculty, who has taken at least one Labour Studies course, to carry out labour related research and/or its dissemination, approved or designed by the Centre.

Richard and Margaret Morgan

SFU alumna Margaret Morgan (MA'76) and her husband, labour radical Richard Ernest "Lefty" Morgan, were life-long learners, educators, and activists.  When she approached the university with a sizable donation in the early 2000s, Margaret hoped that her alma mater would help her realize the dream of improving the educational chances of working-class students.  She and Lefty knew that educating working people was a necessity if the world were to become a better place.

Award Distribution

Up to five awards of $1000.00 each will be granted annually in any term to full-time undergraduate or graduate student in good academic standing, and who has taken at least one LBST course.  Awards may be given to faculty members for specified student researchers, or to students with labour-related projects, in both cases for work deemed of importance and interest to the Morgan Centre. The available funds in any given year may be divided between one or more applicants.

Eligible students and faculty may apply for this award through the Morgan Centre.  As part of the application package, the following supporting documentation must be included:

(a)    a résumé summarizing scholastic achievements and work relevant to the aims of this award;

(b)   copies of university transcripts, and

(c)    a detailed proposal of the research work to be undertaken or disseminated (e.g. as a publication or conference presentation), including a budget and estimated time of completion.

The final nominations for this award will be determined by the Labour Studies Steering Committee.

The awards will be granted by the Senate Undergraduate Awards Adjudication Committee based upon the recommendation of the Director, Morgan Centre for Labour Studies. 

The Gary Campbell May Day Memorial Annual Fund
$1,000 per year

Terms of Reference Summary

The Gary Campbell May Day Memorial Award was established in 2012 by the Burnaby Civic Employees’ Union - CUPE 23  for a generous 10 year commitment. The award is intended to recognize and provide financial assistance to an undergraduate student who is a graduate of the Burnaby School District and is pursuing studies in the Labour Studies Program.

Gary Campbell

Gary Campbell began working in Burnaby as a labourer in 1974. Throughout his career, Gary was a union activist and a member of the CUPE Local 23 Executive. He became a T.D. 1 in 1992 and retired in 2006. Gary’s activism continued throughout his retirement; he was a particularly passionate activist against the North American Free Trade Agreement, the Trade, Investment and Labour Mobility Agreement and the World Trade Organization. Whenever a Wal-Mart or Target opens rather than a Canadian owned establishment, we are encouraged to think of Gary Campbell’s warnings.

Gary passed away on April 9th, 2010 after losing a battle with cancer. He was a retired civic worker at the City of Burnaby and a lifetime member of CUPE Local 23. He was a tireless activist for labour, peace and the environment.

The significance of including ‘May Day’ in the name of this award indicates the importance of recognizing May 1st as a special day in the Labour Movement. 1n 1866, the American Federation of Labor adopted a historic resolution that asserted eight hours constitutes a legal day’s labour. This is a historic achievement in the history of the regulation of labour.

CUPE Local 23 is the union of the workers at the City of Burnaby and the Burnaby Public Library.

The Gary Campbell May Day Memorial Award

The Gary Campbell May Day Memorial Award, valued at $1,000, will be granted every year in any term, to an SFU undergraduate student on the basis of the following criteria:

  • enrolled full-time in any faculty;
  • in good academic standing (minimum 2.00 CGPA);
  • demonstrated volunteerism/community service
  • enrolled in a Labour Studies Course.

Preference will be given to those:

  • with demonstrated community service; and/or,
  • pursuing an approved Minor or Certificate in Labour Studies; and/or,
  • who are graduates of a School District #41 secondary school.

As part of the application package, students must include the following supporting documentation:

  • a letter of reference verifying relevant community service/volunteer work; and,
  • copies of all post-secondary transcripts.

Gary Campbell’s biography will be kept on file in the Finanial Aid office and provided to the recipient of the award.

The award will be made by the Senate Undergraduate Awards Adjudication Committee.

Labour Heritage Centre -- Annual Labour Studies Essay Prize
$1,000 per year

The Labour Heritage Centre is an organization of active and retired trade unionists who wish to create venues where all the workers of BC can be recognized and celebrated for their struggles and achievements.

The Labour Heritage Centre’s mission is to inspire union members, young workers, new Canadians, and students through a wide variety of programs that highlight our working history in British Columbia.

The Labour Heritage Centre is offering an annual prize of $1000 to a student enrolled in a course offered by the Simon Fraser University Labour Studies Program in either the fall or spring semesters.

The prize is to be awarded to a student who writes the best essay on some aspect of labour in British Columbia. The essay should include a historical dimension to the labour topic. Essays should be in the range of 4,000 – 5,000 words and reflect some original research.

Essays should be submitted by April 30 in any given academic year to the Director of the Labour Studies Program at Simon Fraser University.  The Steering Committee of the LBST Program will evaluate submissions and select the winning essay.  The successful recipient will be announced at the end of the spring semester.

The Labour Heritage Centre will retain the right to place the winning essay on their web site with appropriate credit to the author.

For more information, please contact the Director of the Labour Studies Program.

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From the Labour Heritage Centre webpage

‘British Columbia enjoys a rich and vibrant work history. Workers, employers, and unions all played their part in the growth of Canada’s western –most province. This history has been at times celebrated, but seldom in a sustained way, and never from the unique perspective of B.C.’s working people. Recognizing the vital contributions of governments and industries, as well as the risks investors took when opening doors of opportunity, the Labour Heritage Centre concentrates on the women and men from all ethnic backgrounds who have walked through those doors and made an immeasurable social and economic contribution to building, and sustaining, British Columbia.

This history is not only ours, here in B.C.  It is also the historical development of Canada, Canadian society, and North American economy. It is the voice of those who came before us, their struggles and vision of the future, from the perspective of workers.’

BC Ferries and Marine Workers Union (BCFMWU)
$500 (3 awards per year)

Terms of Reference Summary

The BC Ferry and Marine Workers Union (BCFMWU) Annual Award was established at Simon Fraser University in 2015 with a generous gift and three-year commitment from the BC Ferry and Marine Workers Union. The award is intended to offer funding to an undergraduate student pursuing a Minor or Certificate in Labour Studies to offset the tuition costs in any given semester.

BC Ferry and Marine Workers Union

The BC Ferry and Marine Workers Union became the sole bargaining agent for all ferry workers, including licensed officers, on April 27, 1979. The organization now represents over 4,500 working men and women from Vancouver to Prince George.

BC Ferry and Marine Workers Union (BCFMWU) Annual Award

Three awards, valued at a minimum of $500 each, will be granted annually in any term to an undergraduate student who meets the following criteria:

  • is enrolled in full time or part time studies at Simon Fraser University;
  • is in good academic standing (minimum 2.33 GPA)
  • and is pursuing a declared Minor or Certificate in Labor Studies.

Preference will be given to students in the following order of priority:

  1. a BCFMWU member, spouse or child;
  2. a BC Government and Service Employees’ Union (BCGEU) or affiliate member, spouse or child OR Pacific Coast Maritime Council member, spouse or child (includes International Longshore & Warehouse Union or Marine Workers and Boiler Makers Union or Grain Workers Union);
  3.  Any union member, spouse or child;
  4. If not a union member, spouse or child, than any student who meets the general criteria.

Students must submit a 250 word statement describing why they have chosen to pursue Labour Studies and how the program will assist them as a current/future union member.  Students should also submit a letter from a union official confirming the status of the applicant, if applicable.

The award will be administered by the Labour Studies Program, under the supervision of the Director, Labour Studies Program. Please send applications and inquires to lbstadv@sfu.ca.