Opportunities From Coast to Coast

Opportunities From Coast to Coast

By: Laura Forsythe | Indigenous Program Researcher First Nations Student Association Member
  46598 reads

You need to know what’s available where you are! Checkout what’s happening in your own area. Opportunities for growth differ in various sectors across the country

Remember, however, that trends change over time. You should follow up on these leads with an Indigenous Career Advisor may have the latest information on a hot new trend or a sector with a huge need for workers.

Canadian Occupational Projection System (COPS)

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada develops projections of future labour demand and labour supply by broad skill level and by occupation, using the models of the Canadian Occupational Projection System (COPS). The focus of the COPS models and projections is on the trends in labour supply, labour demand and in their respective components and determinants over a 10-year span. These projections allow for identifying those occupations that may face a shortage or surplus of workers over the medium term. The latest projections cover the 2011 to 2020 period.

Users can search for occupational summaries, more detailed data and technical documents on the results or the methodology used to do the projections.

To find out more about a specific Industry or Position visit their website.

British Columbia Job Profile

Like to snowboard or ski? Are you a backpacker? How about adventure tourism? It provides a great opportunity to those interested in the outdoors. Guides and trip leaders are needed. And in the area of service providers, British Columbia needs workers in child care and home support services. Here are some areas of the job market with potential for growth.

Manufacturing

Growth sectors in B.C. manufacturing include metal fabricating, electrical and electronic (computer) products, and oil and gas products.

Occupations include:

  • Petroleum engineers
  • Oil and gas well drillers
  • Machinists, tool and die makers, inspectors
  • Sheet metal workers, boiler makers, ironworkers, blacksmiths, die setters
  • Workers who put together mechanical, electrical and electronic assemblies
  • Truck drivers

Telecommunications

People are needed to provide manufacturing and services in this field.

Occupations include:

  • Electrical and electronics engineers
  • Computer systems analysts
  • Electronics service technicians
  • Telecommunications line and cable workers
  • Salespersons for technical equipment

Service Providers

Want to be of service to people or businesses? Workers are needed in all kinds of service jobs.

Occupations include:

  • Auditors, accountants, investment dealers
  • Mechanical engineers
  • Drafting and surveying technicians and technologists
  • Computer programmers
  • Graphic designers, artists, interior designers
  • Computer graphics animators for computers, television and video games
  • Cashiers — 10,000 job openings in the next seven years

Tourism

Tourism is more than just working in hotels, restaurants, resorts and theatres or on cruise ships.

Occupations include:

  • Taxi and limousine drivers
  • Restaurant and food service managers
  • Retail salespersons and sales clerks
  • Travel counsellors, hotel front desk clerks
  • Landscaping and grounds maintenance workers
  • Bartenders and beverage servers
  • Cooks and chef

Yukon Job Profile

Ever thought about running your own business? Self-employment is growing in Yukon. In the past, government has been the number one employer but, with downsizing, more people are starting their own businesses. Think about building small business skills such as math, computer and communications skills.

 

 

Alberta Job Profile

Want to be in the picture with Alec Baldwin or work on a production with Tom Jackson? Did you know that film and television projects in and around Calgary created employment for more than 1,230 people in Alberta? Or that the forest industry is now one of the province’s largest industries with over $4 billion in new investment?

Oil and Gas Production

Alberta is Canada’s main producer of oil and gas. Over the next 20 to 25 years, oil sands production is expected to triple, resulting in 44,000 new jobs.

Occupations include:

  • Geologists, geochemists, geophysicists
  • Petroleum engineers
  • Geological and mineral technicians and technologists
  • Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics
  • Oil and gas well drillers
  • Petroleum and gas process operators

Telecommunications

Today there are about 220 companies in Alberta providing manufacturing and services in telecommunications.

 Occupations include:

  • Telecommunications installation and repair workers
  • Telecommunications line and cable workers
  • Office equipment operators
  • Computer systems analysts

Tourism

This is one of the province’s largest industries, providing over 100,000 jobs. Adventure tourism is also gaining in popularity across Canada, requiring trip leaders and guides. Many jobs in tourism can be part time and seasonal.

Occupations include:

  • Chefs and cooks
  • Bartenders, food and beverage servers
  • Taxi and limousine drivers
  • Travel counsellors, hotel front desk clerks
  • Restaurant and food service managers
  • Retail salespersons and sales clerks

Saskatchewan Job Profile

Small is Big! Did you know that 22% of all jobs in Saskatchewan are part time, and that 92% of businesses have fewer than 20 employees? There is also an above-average demand for people in all types of cleaning occupations: Dry cleaners, laundry workers, janitors, caretakers, building superintendent, carpet cleaners, vehicle cleaners, and cleaners for hospitals and hotels.

Service Providers

Transportation, communications, utilities, finance, insurance and real estate businesses need service workers.

 Occupations include:

  • Security guards, gate attendants, commissionaires
  • Motor vehicle mechanics
  • Computer systems analysts
  • Real estate agents and salespersons
  • Insurance agents and brokers, loan officers

Health Care

Saskatchewan has long-term needs for people trained in medical services.

Other health-care occupations include:

  • Medical secretaries
  • Medical laboratory technologists, pathologists’ assistants
  • Occupational therapists
  • Physiotherapists
  • General practitioners, family doctors, dentists

Manufacturing

Growth sectors include chemical products, machinery, metal fabricating and electrical and electronic (computer) products manufacturing.

Occupations include:

  • Welders, soldering machine operators
  • Machinists, tool and die makers, inspectors
  • Electrical, instrument, electronic engineering technologistsand technicians
  • Chemical and mineral technologists and technicians
  • Engineers

Sales and Services

Saskatchewan is experiencing a big demand for early childhood educators and assistants.

Other sales and service occupations include:

  • Cooks, food service counter attendants, bartenders, foodand beverage servers
  • Baby-sitters, nannies, parents’ helpers
  • Hairstylists, barbers
  • Retail managers, retail sales clerks

Manitoba Job Profile

Some quick facts:

  • For its size, Manitoba has more manufacturing jobs than any other Western Province.
  • Two-thirds of Manitoba’s population and its jobs are in the Winnipeg region.
  • 17% of Manitobans are self-employed.

Manufacturing

Industries looking for workers include food processing and makers of health-care devices, aeroplane parts, electronic instruments, bus and farm machinery, furniture, medicines and prescription drugs.

Occupations include:

  • Construction millwrights, industrial mechanics
  • Food and beverage processing machine operators
  • Workers who build mechanical, electrical and electronic assemblies
  • Machinists, tool and die operators, inspectors
  • Engineering technicians and technologists
  • Civil, mechanical, electrical and chemical engineers

Tourism

Here is another province where tourism is growing and providing many jobs. Remember that many of these jobs are seasonal and part time.

Related occupations include:

  • Artists and performers
  • Retail salespersons and sales clerks
  • Restaurant and food service managers
  • Bus and other transit drivers
  • Food counter attendants, kitchen helpers
  • Bartenders, food and beverage servers
  • Chefs, cooks

Truck Transportation

Trucking is always a good area of employment.

Related occupations include:

  • Shippers, receivers, dispatchers
  • Truck drivers
  • Truck mechanics

Northwest Territories Job Profile

Can you think of services or goods that are needed where you live? There are opportunities for running your own business across the territory.

Look for more employment and business possibilities in many small communities. Oil and gas production is expanding in the western part of the territory. Tourism is growing in all seasons as visitors from around the world come to enjoy the beautiful scenery. Did you know that about 1,500 Japanese tourists visit the territory between December and March to view the Northern Lights?

Retail Sales

Yellowknife has a growing need in this area.

Occupations include:

  • Grocery clerks, shelf stockers, service station attendants
  • Retail salespersons and sales clerks
  • Retail managers
  • Food counter attendants, kitchen helpers
  • Bartenders, food and beverage servers
  • Chefs and cooks

Mining

Nine mines in the Northwest Territories employ almost 2,000 people and produce primarily gold, but also lead, zinc and diamonds.

Occupations include:

  • Underground mine service and support workers
  • Heavy equipment operators
  • Underground miners
  • Geological and mineral technologists and technicians
  • Geologists, geophysicists and geochemists

Nunavut Job Profile

The new territory and its government need trained people. This is creating many opportunities for northerners. In Nunavut, everything is growing!

Education

The demand for trained northerners means that Nunavut needs instructors and school staff too.

Occupations include:

  • Teachers, school community counsellors
  • Education program officers

Service Providers

From telecommunications to office supplies, the new government needs services. This is creating many opportunities for small businesses and entrepreneurs.

Occupations include:

  • Office equipment technicians
  • Caterers
  • Computer systems analysts
  • Retail managers and salespersons
  • Consultants in many fields

Government

The new territorial government has hired 600 staff in Iqaluit and communities throughout the region.

Occupations include:

  • Bookkeepers and finance officers
  • Doctors, dentists, nurses and health para-professionals
  • Secretaries and clerical staff
  • Social workers
  • Interpreters / translators
  • Computer systems analysts
  • Communications officers
  • Lawyers

Construction

Nunavut needs new buildings and families need new homes.

Occupations include:

  • General contractors
  • Heavy equipment operators
  • Carpenters, electricians, and other skilled tradespeople

Natural Resources, Tourism and Sustainable Development

Did you know that Nunavut will soon have three national parks? Mining, tourism, and the administration of Nunavut’s land claim are creating new jobs on the land.

Occupations include:

  • Surveyors
  • Mining technologists
  • Entrepreneurs in eco-tourism
  • Geologists, biologists, and other scientists
  • Historians and anthropologists

Ontario Job Profile

Are you a mean machine with a joy stick? Ontario has two areas of growth where your computer skills could be in demand:

  • Wireless communications engineering and computer programming, designing, building and testing equipment for cellular phones, beepers and satellite broadcasting; and
  • Computer graphics and computerized animation for conceiving,designing and drawing the illustrations for computer, video and television.

Tourism

Although often seasonal and part time, is big business. Work in hotels, recreation, entertainment, and food and beverage serving is growing. Here are some other areas expected to see growth:

Service Providers

Businesses and individuals both require various services.

Occupations in services to people include:

  • Food counter attendants, kitchen helpers
  • Child care, home support workers
  • Retail salespersons and sales clerks
  • Hairstylists and barbers
  • Retail managers

Occupations in services to business include:

  • Auditors and accountants
  • Insurance and real estate agents
  • Salespersons who sell technical products
  • Graphic designers, artists, interior decorators
  • Computer systems analysts

Logistics

This is a new and growing field. As a logistics professional, you would help manage the buying, production and movement of goods and information from one company to another

Occupations include:

  • Delivery drivers and couriers
  • Cargo handlers
  • Retail and wholesale buyers
  • Stock clerks for motor vehicle parts
  • Shippers, receivers and dispatchers
  • Purchasing and inventory clerks

Manufacturing

Check out the chemical industry, metal fabrication, electrical and electronic equipment (computers) and motor vehicle, trailer and parts manufacturing.

Occupations include:

  • Plastics and rubber processing machine operators
  • Motor vehicle mechanics
  • Construction millwrights, industrial mechanics
  • Machinists, tool and die makers, inspectors
  • Computer programmers
  • Industrial and manufacturing engineers

Health Care

There is a demand for workers in health and medicine in laboratories, nursing homes, dentists’ offices and private residences. With shorter hospital stays and more people getting health care at home instead of in hospital, there is definitely a need for home care workers.

Occupations include:

  • Visiting homemakers
  • Housekeepers
  • Nurse-aides
  • Orderlies
  • Dental hygienists and therapists
  • Medical technicians and technologists

Quebec Job Profile

Software is big business in Quebec. And there is a potential for growth in logistics, tourism and manufacturing, too.

Software

Quebec has numerous companies which are developing software programs for the global marketplace.

Occupations include:

  • Computer programmers
  • Computer systems analysts
  • Computer engineers

Manufacturing

Explore a career in metal fabrication, aircraft and parts manufacturing, or electrical and electronic (computer) manufacturing.

Occupations include:

  • Machine fitters
  • Machinists, tool and die makers, inspectors
  • Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics and technicians
  • Aerospace engineers
  • Industrial and manufacturing engineers

Tourism

Remember that many of these occupations are seasonal orpart time.

Occupations include:

  • Creative artists, performers
  • Cashiers
  • Retail salespersons and sales clerks
  • Travel, hotel and recreation attendants
  • Bartenders, food and beverage servers

Logistics

What is this? It’s helping manage the purchase, production and movement of goods and information from one company to another.

Occupations include:

  • Courier services drivers
  • Cargo handlers
  • Retail and wholesale buyers
  • Stock clerks for motor vehicle parts
  • Shippers, receivers, dispatchers
  • Purchasing and inventory clerks

New Brunswick Job Profile

Get to know your blue jeans from the inside out! Textile and garment manufacturing is a new success story. Companies making garment labels, denim fabric, clothing and gloves are moving into northern New Brunswick. They are expected to employ more than 1,600 people within the next few years. Multimedia services to businesses are also taking off. As businesses go on-line, there is more work for people who know their way around the Internet and are interested in computer graphics and design. As well, home support workers will be in demand, especially as the government cuts back on hospital services. More people will need help at home. If you have a talent for caring for others, this could be a good occupation. Potential growth is expected in the following areas:

Telecommunications

There is a big demand for computer science programmers with knowledge of transmission technologies and routing systems.

Occupations include:

  • Office telecommunications equipment operators
  • Salespersons who sell technical equipment
  • Electrical and electronic engineering technologistsand technicians
  • Computer programmers
  • Computer systems analysts
  • Electrical and electronic engineers

Tourism

Don’t forget that occupations in tourism are often seasonal or part time.

Occupations include:

  • Taxi and limousine drivers
  • Travel counsellors, hotel front desk clerks
  • Cashiers
  • Bartenders, food and beverage servers
  • Chefs, cooks

Prince Edward Island Job Profile

If you’re good at helping people solve problems and love to talk on the phone, you might consider working in one of the new call centres. They’re run by companies that employ telephone service clerks to help customers with products such as computers and telephones. Growth is also expected in food processing and tourism.

Food Processing

Consider a challenging career in processing, testing, grading and packaging food for the public.

Occupations include:

  • Food and beverage processing machine operators
  • Agricultural inspectors
  • Material handlers (manual or with machines)
  • Processing labourers
  • Truck drivers
  • Delivery drivers

Tourism

There should be increasing opportunities for employment in hotels and restaurants, but don’t forget that many are seasonal or part time.

Occupations include:

  • Landscape and grounds maintenance workers
  • Cleaners
  • Cashiers
  • Food counter attendants, kitchen helpers
  • Bartenders, food and beverage servers
  • Chefs, cooks

Nova Scotia Job Profile

Did you know that work to benefit the environment is on the increase? Consider working in the areas of alternative energies,or managing solid waste or waste water. There will likely be a significant number of jobs created in these fields over the next few years.

Manufacturing

Nova Scotia will see growth in the chemical, plastics, and electrical and electronics (computers) industries.

Occupations include:

  • Salespersons who sell technical equipment
  • Electronics assemblers, fabricators, testers
  • Plastics processing machine operators
  • Chemical engineers
  • Mechanical engineers

Retail Trade

This is a high growth area in Nova Scotia with lots of potential. Many retail occupations are part time.

Occupations include:

  • Cashiers
  • Customer service clerks
  • Retail salespersons and sales clerks
  • Shippers and receivers
  • Purchasing and inventory clerks
  • Retail managers

Service providers — For Business

More people are needed to serve these growing businesses.

Occupations include:

  • Security guards, commissionaires, gate attendants
  • Architectural, drafting and survey technologists and technicians
  • Auditors and accountants
  • Investment professionals
  • Computer programmers
  • Computer systems analysts

Tourism

If you like dealing with the public, you might find work in restaurants, hotels, campgrounds and recreational facilities.

Occupations include:

  • Bartenders, food and beverage servers
  • Tour and recreational guides
  • Travel counsellors, hotel front desk clerks

Newfoundland and Labrador Job Profile

Want to make the world a better place to live? What about helping develop new technologies to improve the environment in fisheries, forestry, mining or off-shore drilling — oil-spill clean-up, waste management or environmental assessment? Or, if you’re interested in the visual, performing, literary or media arts, the province’s culture is the basis of a sizeable industry employing 2,300 people directly and 1,100 indirectly. As well, companies offering services to business or individuals provide 75% of all jobs in Newfoundland.

Some potential growth may occur in:

  • Manufacturing: A growth industry with approximately 700 employers and 12,600 workers.
  • Small business sector: The fastest growing in Canada with 83% of new jobs in companies with fewer than five employees.

Tourism

Newfoundland and Labrador’s beautiful wilderness, coastline and waterways are attracting an increasing number of visitors who want to hunt, fish and backpack in the mountains, or tour by bicycle, boat or horseback. Adventure tourism should provide lots of new opportunities as well. Remember that many of these jobs are seasonal or part time.

Occupations include:

  • Food counter attendants, kitchen helpers
  • Bartenders, food and beverage servers
  • Restaurant and food service managers
  • Tour and travel guides
  • Travel counsellors, hotel front desk clerks
  • Chefs and cooks

Information Technologies

Do you enjoy working with computers? Game design, computer graphics, multimedia are some new and interesting fields to explore.

Occupations include:

  • Telecommunications installation and repair work
  • Computer programmers
  • Computer systems analysts
  • Electrical and electronics engineers, engineering technologists, and technicians

Metal and Precious Metal

Exploration in Labrador and future production at Voisey Bay’s nickel mines mean more work for people interested in hands-on careers.

Occupations include:

  • Geological and mineral technologists and technicians
  • Industrial electricians
  • Underground miners
Posted on April 24, 2013