Fall 2015 - PSYC 250 D100

Introduction to Developmental Psychology (3)

Class Number: 5984

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
    RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 18, 2015
    12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
    Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    PSYC 102 (or 101).

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Considers the psychological and physical aspects of human development from conception through middle childhood. Topics include social, emotional, language, cognitive, perceptual and physical development. Students with credit for PSYC 350 or 351 may not take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course will provide you with a general introduction to major theories, perspectives, research developments and methods in developmental psychology. Topics covered in this course will include theory and research related to prenatal, cognitive, emotional, social, language and moral development, as well as the influence of culture on development. Emphasis will be placed on fostering critical analysis of current theories, methodology, as well as discussing underlying assumptions in the developmental psychological literature.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

1) To understand how developmental processes unfold, relate to and build upon one another.
2) To understand theoretical perspectives in the field.
3) To know the details of empirical evidence.

Grading

  • Mid-Term Exam: 30%
  • Final Exam: 40%
  • Term Paper/Project: 30%

NOTES:

Class format: One weekly lecture (2 hours and 50 min); Will consist of lectures, activities, films, and discussion. One short break will be given in class as needed.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Siegler, R., Eisenberg, N., Deloache, J., Saffran, J., & Graham, S. (2014). How Children Develop (4th Canadian Ed.). New York, NY: Worth Publishers.
ISBN: 978-1-4641-0780-1

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS