Fall 2017 - PHYS 455 D100

Modern Optics (3)

Class Number: 1582

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
    AQ 5020, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 13, 2017
    12:00 PM – 3:00 PM
    Location: TBA

  • Prerequisites:

    PHYS 321 or 221, with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: PHYS 385.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Optical physics, including geometrical and physical optics, waves in anisotropic media, coherence, image formation and Fourier optics, guided wave optics and selected advanced topics such as lasers, nonlinear optics, photonics and quantum optics. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:



Geometrical Optics
    --review of elementary notions; matrix formulations

 Physical Optics
    --review of basic notions of interference, diffraction
    --more advanced notions, including coherence, image formation, anisotropic media, polarization, Fourier methods, guided waves
           
 Selected Advanced Topics
    --According to instructor and class interest.  Possible topics include lasers, nonlinear optics, photonics and quantum optics

  1. Historical introduction and review of basic wave phenomena
  2. Geometrical optics
  3. Fourier analysis
  4. Electromagnetic waves
  5. Polarization and anisotropic media
  6. Diffraction
  7. Fourier optics
  8. Interferometry
  9. Guided waves and modulated media
  10. Coherence
  11. Quantum optics and lasers

Grading

  • TBA

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

REQUIRED TEXT:
Optical Physics   4th edition
Author: Lipson
Publisher: Cambridge
ISBN: 9780521493451

Department Undergraduate Notes:

Students who cannot write their exam during the course's scheduled exam time must request accommodation from their instructor in writing, clearly stating the reason for this request, before the end of the first week of classes.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS