Fall 2018 - LBST 202 D100

Labour Research for Social Change: Methods and Approaches (3)

Class Number: 9317

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    AQ 5040, Burnaby

  • Instructor:

    Kendra Strauss
    kstrauss@sfu.ca
    Office: AQ 6220
    Office Hours: TU 13:00-14:20; WE 09:00-10:00
  • Prerequisites:

    LBST 101 or with permission of instructor.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Introduces students to labour research through methodology and research methods for social change. By exploring what methodology is, the methods common in labour research, and understandings of social justice, students gain experience of quantitative and qualitative approaches, including survey research. Focuses on using and interpreting quantitative data and statistics for social justice and social change. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:

Introduces students to labour research through methodology and research methods for social change. By exploring what methodology is, the methods common in labour research, and understandings of social justice, students gain experience of quantitative and qualitative approaches, including survey research. Focuses on using and interpreting quantitative data and statistics for social justice and social change. Quantitative.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

Upon satisfactory completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the concept of methodology and how it applies to labour-oriented research,
  • Define and apply research approaches grounded in social justice aims, with a focus on empirical research,
  • Show familiarity with Canadian datasets, including the Labour Force Survey and Census,
  • Identify appropriate quantitative and qualitative methods for conducting research on work-related topics,
  • Utilize descriptive statistics and interpret basic regression models,
  • Conduct an original research project on a labour topic using quantitative methods and data.

Grading

  • Attendance 5%
  • In-class tutorial assignments (2 x 5%) 10%
  • Midterm exam 20%
  • Group project 15%
  • Research proposal 10%
  • Research paper 40%

NOTES:

All assignments in this course must be completed for a final grade to be assigned.  The Morgan Centre for Labour Studies follows SFU policy in relation to grading practices, grade appeals (Policy T 20.01) and academic honesty and misconducted procedures (S10.01-S10.04).  It is the responsibility of the students to inform themselves of the content of these policies available on the SFU website: http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/teaching.html.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Brown, L. A. and Strega, S. (Eds.). (2015). Research as Resistance: Revisiting Critical, Indigenous, and Anti-oppressive Approaches, (2nd ed.). Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.
ISBN: 978-1-551308821

Gray, D. E. (2018). Doing Research in the Real World, (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
ISBN: 978-1-473947276

Van de Sande, A. and Byvelds, C. (2015). Statistics For Social Justice: A Structural Perspective. Black Point, NS :Fernwood.
ISBN: 978-1-552667972

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS