Fall 2018 - PHIL 105 E100

Critical Thinking (3)

Class Number: 6325

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
    HCC 1415, Vancouver

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 6, 2018
    7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
    HCC 1700, Vancouver

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An introduction to the evaluation of arguments as they are encountered in everyday life. The central aim will be to sharpen skills of reasoning and argumentation by understanding how arguments work and learning to distinguish those which actually prove what they set out to show from those which do not. Open to all students. Student with credit for PHIL XX1 may not take this course for further credit. Q/Breadth-Social Sci/Sciences.

COURSE DETAILS:

An argument presents a set of reasons for believing a particular claim.  This course is an introduction to the evaluation of arguments as they are encountered in everyday life. The central aim will be to sharpen skills of reasoning and argumentation by understanding how arguments work and to learn to distinguish those that actually prove what they set out to demonstrate from those that do not.  The course includes the study of basic types of reasoning, the structure of argument, and criteria of argument assessment, particularly arguments that are ‘inductive’.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

PHIL 105 may be applied towards the Certificate in Liberal Arts, the Quantitative Requirement, and the Breadth-Social Sciences Requirement OR the Breadth-Science Requirement (but not both; student can choose which Breadth requirement to satisfy and plan enrollment in other courses accordingly).

Note: PHIL 105 has replaced PHIL XX1. If you have taken PHIL XX1 in the past and you enroll in PHIL 105, it will be considered a repeat.

 

 

Grading

  • First test 20%
  • Second test 30%
  • Final exam 40%
  • Class participation (assessed on the basis of both attendance and contributions to class discussion) 10%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Merrilee Salmon. Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking 6th edition

Department Undergraduate Notes:

Thinking of a Philosophy Major or Minor? The Concentration in Law and Philosophy? The Certificate in Ethics? The Philosophy and Methodology of Science Certificate?
Contact the PHIL Advisor at philmgr@sfu.ca   More details on our website: SFU Philosophy

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS