Spring 2018 - BISC 420 D100

Community Ecology (3)

Class Number: 1343

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
    AQ 5016, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 12, 2018
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    Location: TBA

  • Prerequisites:

    BISC 204 or GEOG 215; with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course will examine the importance of species interactions that occur in ecological communities and the role of biotic and abiotic, natural and anthropogenic processes that underpin large-scale patterns of biodiversity. The course will provide a strong conceptual framework in community ecology with a focus on hypothesis development, alternative methodological approaches, the interpretation of data, and the synthesis of information across studies. Students who have completed BISC 304 or BISC 404 may not take BISC 420 for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

 This course will examine the importance of species interactions that occur in ecological communities and the role of biotic and abiotic, natural and anthropogenic processes that underpin large-scale patterns of biodiversity. The course will provide a strong conceptual framework in community ecology with a focus on hypothesis development, alternative methodological approaches, the interpretation of data, and the synthesis of information across studies.   This course, in combination with a new lab and field based methods course for the Ecology, Evolution and Conservation stream, replaces BISC 304 (Animal Ecology) and BISC 404 (Plant Ecology). BISC 420 complements courses on behavioral ecology (BSIC 410) and population dynamics (BISC 409) that together provide upper level courses in ecology at the level of the individual, population and community.   Students that have taken BISC 304 or BISC 404 may not take this course for additional credit.  

Outline of Topics: The Big Picture: communities and patterns of biological diversity; the Fine Details: species interactions and community theory, food chains and foodwebs, complexity and ecosystem function/stability, succession and community assembly rules: Species in a Changing Environment: changes to landscapes, loss of species and reassembly/restoration of communities.

Grading

  • Midterm 20%
  • Final 40%
  • Presentation (3 x 9%) 27%
  • Paper Summaries (3 x 3%) 9%
  • Tutorial Participation 4%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Required - Community Ecology (2012). Gary G. Mittelbach. Sinauer Associates

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS