Spring 2018 - EASC 208 D100

Introduction to Geochemistry (3)

Class Number: 1946

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
    BLU 10031, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 15, 2018
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    Location: TBA

  • Instructor:

    Daniel Marshall
    marshall@sfu.ca
    1 778 782-5474
    Office: TASC 1 Room 7231
  • Prerequisites:

    EASC 202, CHEM 121, 122 and 126. All with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Distribution and cycles of elements, minerals and rocks on and within Earth. Understanding and evolution of Earth systems through high and low temperature fluid-rock interaction, aqueous geochemistry, stable and radiogenic isotopes. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:

General: REQUIREMENT DESIGNATION: Q
- Introductory concepts of geochemical systems:      Nucleosynthesis, Atomic structure, Periodic Table, Cosmic Evolution
- Global Chemical Differentiation
- Chemical Bonds
- Ionic Substitution in Crystals
- Thermodynamics
- Stable Isotopes
- Radiogenic Isotopes and Geochronology
- Stable Mineral Assemblages, Phase Diagrams
- Geothermobarometry - Atmospheric/Oceanic Evolution and Chemistry
- Geochemical Cycles
- Crustal Fluids
- Simple and Multicomponent Mixing
- Geochemistry of the Major Rock Types:      Sedimentary Rocks, Igneous Rocks, Metamorphic Rocks

Grading

  • Midterm Examination 15%
  • Laboratory Assignments 15%
  • Final Lab Examination 25%
  • Presentation/Paper 10%
  • Final Theory Examination 35%

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

Calculator

REQUIRED READING:

Principles and Applications of Geochemistry, 2nd edition, G. Faure, Prentice-Hall Inc., 1997
ISBN: 978-0-02-336450-1

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS