Spring 2018 - EASC 307 D100

Applied Geophysics (3)

Class Number: 1978

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
    RCB 5125, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 17, 2018
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    Location: TBA

  • Instructor:

    Andy Calvert
    acalvert@sfu.ca
    1 778 782-5511
    Office: TASC 1 Room 7415
  • Prerequisites:

    EASC 207 with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Application, instrumentation and limitations of electrical, electromagnetic, ground penetrating radar and seismic methods for engineering and geoscience applications. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:

General: REQUIREMENT DESIGNATION: Q
Application of geophysical methods to the study of the subsurface. This course complements the material presented in EASC 207 "Introduction to Geophysics", which covered the simplest of the methods of applied geophysics. In EASC 307, more advanced geophysical survey methods are presented, including ground penetrating radar, time and frequency domain electromagnetic techniques, and seismic reflection methods. The additional complexity of these methods over those of EASC 207 arises from both the more complex relation between the physical measurements and the subsurface properties and the manipulation of the recorded data that is required. An introduction to the use of geophysical methods in the borehole environment, which relies on much of the material from EASC 207, is also presented. The course text is the same as used in EASC 207.

Course Topics:
·  Representation of the subsurface by a convolutional model
·  Ground Penetrating Radar
·  Electromagnetic Surveying
·  Seismic reflection methods
·  Borehole geophysics

Grading

  • Midterm Exam 15%
  • Laboratory Assignments 35%
  • Final Exam 50%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Reynolds, J.M., "An Introduction to Applied and Environmental Geophysics", 2nd Edition, 2011, Wiley
ISBN: 978-0-471-48536-0

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

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