Spring 2018 - EASC 609 G100

Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Remote Sensing Applications (3)

Class Number: 12791

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We 3:30 PM – 4:50 PM
    WMC 3531, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 16, 2018
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    Location: TBA

  • Prerequisites:

    Recommended: undergraduate courses in advanced mathematics, remote sensing, geophysics, natural hazards (or permission of instructor).

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Principles of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Remote Sensing and its Applications. An overview of the basic theory is presented to understand the capabilities and limitations of complex SAR data and their key land and marine applications. Learning outcomes for the course include proficiency with applications of interferometric SAR (InSAR) to Geosciences, including generation of topographic maps as well as advanced time series analysis for measuring ground surface motion associated with seismic displacement, compaction related subsidence volcanic inflate and landslides.

COURSE DETAILS:

General:   This course reviews the principles of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Remote Sensing and its Applications. An overview of the basic theory is presented to understand the capabilities and limitations of complex SAR data and their key land and marine applications. The course focus is on interferometric SAR (InSAR) applications, including generation of topographic maps as well as advanced time series analysis for measuring ground surface motion associated with seismic displacement, compaction related subsidence, volcanic inflation, and landslides.  


Recommended courses: undergraduate courses in advanced mathematics, remote sensing, geophysics, natural hazards (or permission of instructor)      


Course Topics:

  • Radar and SAR principles
  • SAR marine applications 
  • SAR land applications
  • InSAR principles
  • InSAR processing (interferogram formation, phase unwrapping, geocoding)
  • InSAR applications (topography)
  • InSAR applications (differential InSAR, 3D velocity)
  • Advanced applications (Polarimetric InSAR andTomography)
  • Advanced processing (Surface displacement time series)
  • Advanced applications (Surface displacement time series – infrastructure)
  • Advanced applications (Surface displacement time series – natural hazards) 

Course Organization:   2 one and a half-hour lectures and 1 three-hour computer laboratory per week. Weekly assignments. 1 term research paper (topic either on evaluating/developing a novel method/algorithm or applied analysis of actual InSAR data).

Grading

  • Lab Assignments 30%
  • Research Paper 60%
  • Class Participation 10%

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

The course does not use a specific textbook. A number of books area available that cover the course topics e.g.:

  • Radar interferometry: data interpretation and error analysis. RF Hanssen. Springer Science & Business Media. 2001 
  • Radar Interferometry: Persistent Scatterer Technique. Author: BM. Kampes. Springer Science & Business Media. 2014 
  • Digital Processing of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data: Algorithms and Implementation. IG Cumming, FH Wong. Artech House - Technology & Engineering. 2005

Powerpoint lecture materials, lab instructions, software manuals, and data sets required for the lab assignments will be provided. 

Additional Resources: 

  • Massonet, D. & Souyris, J.-C. (2008): Imaging with Synthetic Aperture Radar. EPFL Press distributed by CRC Press
  • Henderson, F.M. & Lewis, A.J. (1998): Principles and Applications of Imaging Radar. Manual of Remote Sensing. Third Edition, Vol. 2. John Wiley & Sons. Inc.
  • Olivie, C. & Quegan, S. (2004): Understanding Synthetic Aperture Radar Images. Scitech.
  • Lee, J.-S. & Pottier, E. (2009): Polarimetric Radar Imaging. From Basics to Applications. CRC Press, Taylor & Francis.
  • Rees, G. (2006): Remote Sensing of Snow and Ice. CRC Press, Taylor & Francis.
  • Ferretti, A., Monti-Guarneri, A., Prati, C., Rocca, F. & Massonet, D. (2007): InSAR Principles. Guidelines for SAR Interferometry Processing and Interpretation. ESA TM-19, ISBN 92-9092-233-8

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS