Spring 2018 - PHIL 105 D100

Critical Thinking (3)

Class Number: 2893

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu, Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
    WMC 3520, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An introduction to the evaluation of arguments as they are encountered in everyday life. The central aim will be to sharpen skills of reasoning and argumentation by understanding how arguments work and learning to distinguish those which actually prove what they set out to show from those which do not. Open to all students. Student with credit for PHIL XX1 may not take this course for further credit. Q/Breadth-Social Sci/Sciences.

COURSE DETAILS:

In this course, students will acquire and practice the skills associated with argument analysis. This includes learning how to recognize arguments, reconstruct arguments clearly and charitably, and evaluate their rational strength. Along the way, students will be introduced to informal and formal reasoning tools, such as logic, probability, decision theory, and statistical reasoning.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

PHIL 105 may be applied towards the Certificate in Liberal Arts, the Quantitative Requirement, and the Breadth-Social Sciences Requirement OR the Breadth-Science Requirement (but not both; student can choose which Breadth requirement to satisfy and plan enrollment in other courses accordingly).

Note
: PHIL 105 has replaced PHIL XX1. If you have taken PHIL XX1 in the past and you enroll in PHIL 105, it will be considered a repeat.


Grading

  • 4 problem sets worth 10% each 40%
  • Midterm 30%
  • Take-home final exam 30%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Readings will be available on Canvas.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS