Spring 2018 - PHIL 151 D900

History of Philosophy II (3)

Class Number: 2929

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    SUR 5100, Surrey

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 20, 2018
    12:00 PM – 3:00 PM
    Location: TBA

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

A survey of philosophic thought from the Renaissance to the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the works of Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel and Mill. The views of these great thinkers have helped to shape the ways in which we see the world. This course is therefore recommended to everyone with an interest in our intellectual heritage. Open to all students. Breadth-Humanities.

COURSE DETAILS:

A survey of western philosophy from the Renaissance to the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the works of Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, and Mill. The course will cover questions in epistemology, metaphysics and ethics.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

PHIL 151 may be applied towards the Certificate in Liberal Arts and the Breadth-Humanities Requirement.

The aim of the course is for students to be exposed to a recent historical overview of philosophy and the development of debates throughout the Early Modern and Modern periods and into the 20th century. This will serve as a foundational course for Philosophy majors. The course material and assigned work will also help students to develop analytical skills in reading and writing, which will have wide ranging applications in their academic work for other subjects and their lives generally.

Grading

  • Participation (assessed on the basis of both antendance and contributions to class discussion) 15%
  • Short Writing Assignments 30%
  • Midterm exam 25%
  • Final exam 30%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Ariew and Watkins (Eds) - Modern Philosophy: An Anthology of Primary Sources, 2nd Edition

Mill - Utilitarianism

Kant - Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals: with On a Supposed Right to Lie because of Philanthropic Concerns

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS