Spring 2018 - PHIL 803 G100

Selected Topics in Metaphysics (5)

Physicalism

Class Number: 12367

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 6:30 PM – 9:20 PM
    HCC 1500, Vancouver

Description

COURSE DETAILS:

Selected Topics: Physicalism, or Naturalism 

[Note: this course is a joint SFU/UBC Seminar in Metaphysics, taught by SFU.]

Important note regarding enrollment: only Philosophy graduate students (SFU and UBC) have access to this course.
UBC graduate students: enrollment is done through the Western Dean's Agreement in the SFU course PHIL 803. The paperwork for enrollment goes through UBC Graduate Studies office and takes longer than regular enrollment, so please plan early. 
 

We begin the course by looking (briefly) at debates about physicalism in the philosophy of mind and ethics.

In the second part of the course, we turn to a more general question: How is physicalism to be defined? In particular, we consider various modal definitions of physicalism/naturalism, before turning to definitions that use the notions of ground or fundamentality.

In the third part of the course, we turn to a case study: physicalism in the philosophy of mathematics. Is physicalism about mathematics credible? Is it well-motivated?

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

 

Grading

  • One final paper 100%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Readings will be provided by the instructor as needed.

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS