Fall 2019 - BISC 305 D100

Animal Physiology (3)

Class Number: 2674

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
    EDB 7618, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 5, 2019
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    WMC 3520, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    MBB 221 or 231 and PHYS 102 (or PHYS 121 or 126 or 141) with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

A comparative study of basic physiological mechanisms in invertebrates and vertebrates.

COURSE DETAILS:

Physiology is about the “nuts and bolts” of how organisms work, from molecules through cells, tissues, organs, up to the level of the whole organism.


Outline of Topics:

  • General principles of physiology 
  • Basic biochemistry and cell physiology (which will hopefully be review)
  • Circulatory and respiratory systems
  • Digestion
  • Osmoregulation nitrogen excretion
  • Nerves, sensory systems and nervous systems 
  • Muscles 

Grading

  • Midterm Exam 30%
  • Final Exam 40%
  • Assignments 10%
  • Tutorial Participation/Attendance 5%
  • Quizzes 15%

NOTES:

The exams will be based entirely on material presented in lectures. However, the lectures will follow the textbook closely and therefore reading the text will probably help to understand the lecture material (there will be at least one copy of the text on reserve in the library). The slides used in lecture will be made available on the course website (prior to the relevant lecture, where possible), although the lecture slides and textbook should not be considered substitutes for attending lectures.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

None

RECOMMENDED READING:

Principles of animal physiology, Second Edition by Christopher D. Moyes and Patricia M. Schulte. Pearson, 2008.  
First or third editions are fine.
ISBN: 0321501551

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS