Fall 2019 - CA 339 E100

Directing and Acting for Film and Video (3)

Class Number: 9859

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 5:30 PM – 7:20 PM
    GCA 4955, GOLDCORP

  • Prerequisites:

    CA (or FPA) 231, or CA (or FPA) 251 with prior approval.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course acquaints intermediate level students with techniques of dramatic film performance. Students will be expected to perform as both actors and directors on scene work in class. Topics covered include auditioning, script analysis, role preparation, rehearsal, blocking for the camera, and directing techniques. This course is not a duplicate of CA (or FPA) 339 Selected Topics in Film. Students with credit for FPA 339 may not take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course is designed to demystify the actor/director relationship in the context of the film and television production process. The three pillars of this course are; Empathy. Process. Performance. Students will learn to empathize with their collaborators by experiencing their counterparts’ jobs. They will develop a process for directing and acting for film/TV. And they will learn to achieve a performance that suits the needs of the story and the production. Directors and actors will learn to work together effectively and efficiently to create on-screen performances that respond to the specific requirements of the project. Through a series of readings, studies, screenings, discussions, in-class exercises and production projects, directors and actors will gain first-hand experience with each other’s processes. Areas of study include acting theory, script analysis/scene study, casting/auditioning, rehearsing, blocking, giving/receiving adjustments, basic filmmaking/editing (as it pertains to creating the illusion of a continuous, believable performance), shooting for the edit. Students will participate in in-class acting exercises and will apply acquired skills through the development and creation of two original short films.

GRADING

10 PARTICIPATION
10 MONOLOGUE ASSIGNMENT
15 IN-CLASS SCENE WORK (ACTING)
15 IN-CLASS SCENE WORK (DIRECTING)
10 MID-TERM PAPER (400 words: ACTING THEORY) 20 MID-TERM SHORT FILM and JOURNAL
20 FINAL SHORT FILM and JOURNAL

*grading scheme/assignment list is provisional until first week of term.

NOTE: Each class will include vocal and physical warm-ups: a crucial part of any actor’s process.

This course will potentially involve complicated issues; personal perspectives, social, political, religious topics and may involve swearing, staged violence and uncomfortable scenes. No student is required to participate in any these things if they don’t want to – please let the instructor know your boundaries in advance. Be aware that other students in the class may be working through some of these challenging concepts and all students are expected to observe each other’s process.

Grading

  • Participation 10%
  • Monologue assignment 10%
  • In-Class Scene work (Acting) 15%
  • In-Class Scene work (Directing) 15%
  • Mid-Term Paper (400 words: Acting Theory) 10%
  • Mid-Term Short Film and Journal 20%
  • Final Short Film and Journal 20%

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

  • You will need access to basic filmmaking equipment: camera, microphone, editing software. Your cell phone (or tablet) and laptop can do the trick,

  • USB jump-drive or external hard drive (ExFAT, or MAC formatting).

REQUIRED READING:

Judith Weston, Directing Actors: Creating Memorable Performances for Film and Television, Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions
ISBN: 9780941188241

Richard Brestoff, Great Acting Teachers and Their Methods, Publisher: Smith and Kraus
ISBN: 1-57525-01208

RECOMMENDED READING:

Richard Brestoff , The Camera Smart Actor, Publisher: Smith and Kraus
ISBN: 1-880399-76-8

Robert Cohen, Acting One, Publisher: McGraw Hill
ISBN: 0-7674-1859-X

Michael Caine, Acting in Film: An Actor’s Take on Movie Making, Publisher: Applause
ISBN: 0-936839-86-4

Marina Caldarone, Maggie Lloyd-Williams, Actions: The Actors' Thesaurus, Publisher: Nick Hern (2004)
ISBN: 9781854596741

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS