Fall 2019 - CMPT 886 G200

Special Topics in Operating Systems (3)

Parallel & Distributed Computing

Class Number: 10709

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
    RCB 6101, Burnaby

    Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
    AQ 5005, Burnaby

Description

COURSE DETAILS:

The course aims to provide an understanding of principles involved in designing modern parallel and distributed software systems. It focuses on the fundamentals of parallel algorithm design and parallel programming techniques by covering key concepts like concurrency, synchronization, consistency models and fault tolerance.

Topics

  • Principles of Parallel Algorithm Design
  • Shared Memory Programming
  • Distributed Memory Model & Programming
  • Consistency Models
  • Fault Tolerance
  • Scalable Analytics

Grading

NOTES:

There will be programming assignments, midterm, and final exam. Details about grading will be discussed in the first week of class.

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

  • The Art of Multiprocessor Programming, Maurice Herlihy and Nir Shavit, Elsevier/Morgan Kaufmann, 2012, 9780123973375
  • Distributed Computing: Principles, Algorithms, and Systems, Ajay D. Kshemkalyani and Mukesh Singhal, Cambridge University Press, 2008,9780521189842

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS