Fall 2019 - EASC 310W D100

Paleontology (3)

Class Number: 5076

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu, Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
    TASC1 7005, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 16, 2019
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    Location: TBA

  • Instructor:

    Robbie Donald
    rdunlop@sfu.ca
    1 778 782-4925
    Office: TASC 1 Room 7223
  • Prerequisites:

    EASC 210. Recommended: BISC 102. All with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Principles of classification, morphology and development of the major groups of animals and plants in the geological record; the paleoecologic significance of fossils. Students with credit for EASC 203 or EASC 310 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

COURSE DETAILS:

Course Description: REQUIREMENT DESIGNATION: W
EASC 310W is an introduction to Paleontology, tracing the evolution of life based on evidence from the fossil record.  The course will concentrate on invertebrate fossil groups and the various morphological criteria necessary for their identification.  In addition, the course will consider the principles of preservation, classification and paleoecological interpretation, in their relation to the main fossil groups important to geology.  Lectures provide the necessary theoretical framework.  Laboratory work will focus on examining morphological elements of the main invertebrate fossil groups and their classification and analytical techniques.  This course is offered as a Writing Intensive course.

Course Organization: Two 50 minute lectures and one 3-hour laboratory class per week.

Grading

  • Grades will be based on a lecture midterm and final exam, 2 lab exams and writing assignments.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Clarkson, E.N.K., 2004, "Invertebrate Palaeontology and Evolution", 4th Edition. Blackwell Science. ISBN:978-0-632-05238-7
ISBN: 978-0-632-05238-7

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS