Fall 2019 - GEOG 251 D100

Quantitative Geography (3)

Class Number: 4315

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
    RCB 8100, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 14, 2019
    12:00 PM – 3:00 PM
    AQ 3149, Burnaby

  • Instructor:

    Shivanand Balram
    sbalram1@sfu.ca
    1 778 782-2003
    Office: RCB 6143
  • Prerequisites:

    GEOG 100 or 111.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An introduction to basic quantitative techniques for the collection of geographic data. Topics include describing data, gathering samples, theoretical distributions, linking samples and populations, testing significance, and exploring spatial relationships all within practical, real-world application contexts. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:

Course Description:
An introduction to basic quantitative techniques for the collection of geographic data. Topics include describing data, gathering samples, theoretical distributions, linking samples and populations, testing significance, and exploring spatial relationships all within practical, real-world application contexts. Examples will be taken from physical and human geography as well as other related subject areas. Computers and data analysis software will be used

Course Content:
Only basic statistics knowledge is assumed. Each topic begins with an introduction, and developed to a level needed for the course. Topics will be taken from: Defining quantitative geography; exploratory data analysis; univariate data analysis; exploring categorical data; writing and presenting statistics; spatial data analysis; time series analysis; data visualization; map-based data analysis; data collection methods; elements of chance; from population to samples; from samples to population; bivariate data relationships; and multivariable data relationships.

Course Organization:
There will be one 2-hrs lecture per week. Students will learn about and practice geographic analysis techniques through formal lectures, computer labs, individual assignments, and analysis of public data. Data analysis software will be used to process real world data from multiple sources. There will be a strong emphasis on problem based and interactive learning. The textbook readings will enhance understanding of the materials presented in the class lectures, and facilitate more meaningful participation during the classroom discussions.

There will be one 2-hrs lab session per week. The guided computer lab sessions will use sample data sets and software analysis to reinforce the theoretical concepts and methods presented in the class lectures. These labs will allow students to apply the quantitative methods to a variety of data and problem contexts within geography. The software is available in the SIS lab (Windows networked).

Lectures, Labs and Office Hours begin in the first week of the term.

Notes:
This course may be applied towards the SIS Certificate Program or the Certificate in Liberal Arts.
The contents are subject to minor changes depending on the number of students and available resources.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
- Explain and practically apply quantitative geography concepts
- Critically evaluate quantitative methods and real-world applications
- Demonstrate competence in using software tools for data analysis
- Creatively design and implement quantitative analysis projects for problem solving

Grading

  • Participation 3%
  • Assignments 42%
  • Mini-Project 20%
  • Final Exam 35%

NOTES:

All marks in the course are absolute and hence NOT scaled or assigned based on a curve.

Materials

RECOMMENDED READING:

None. Specific supporting materials will be made available during the course.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS