Fall 2019 - HIST 436 D100

British Columbia (4)

Class Number: 4908

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    HCC 2205, Vancouver

  • Prerequisites:

    45 units including nine units of lower division history. Recommended: HIST 101 and 102W.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Selected problems in the social, cultural, economic and political development of British Columbia.

COURSE DETAILS:

Whether you are from British Columbia or came to SFU from somewhere else, you are living in a space shaped by a unique set of peoples and processes. This course will introduce students to the social and cultural history of British Columbia from the eighteenth through to the twentieth centuries. We will explore the history of contact and conflict between the peoples who lived and settled in BC and examine how these encounters shaped the economies, societies, and politics of the province. Topics include: exploration and empire; settler-colonialism; Indigenous history; race, gender, age and sexuality in shaping society and experience; and land and power in the making of British Columbia. This course will include field trips to various local archives and museums.

The class meets once per week and will consist of lectures and tutorials.

Grading

  • Participation 25%
  • Map Quiz 5%
  • Museum exhibit and field trip reviews (3 x 10%) 30%
  • Research Proposal 5%
  • Research Paper 35%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Readings will be made available on Canvas or on reserve through the library.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Recommended: Patricia Roy and John Thomson, British Columbia: Land of Promises (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005)

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS